carbonization

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carbonization

[‚kär·bə·nə′zā·shən]
(chemistry)
The conversion of a carbon-containing substance to carbon or a carbon residue as the destructive distillation of coal by heat in the absence of air, yielding a solid residue with a higher percentage of carbon than the original coal; carried on for the production of coke and of fuel gas.
(geochemistry)
In the coalification process, the accumulation of residual carbon by changes in organic material and their decomposition products.
Deposition of a thin film of carbon by slow decay of organic matter underwater.
A process of converting a carbonaceous material to carbon by removal of other components.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 4 shows the total flow rate [V.sub.Total] (above) and mole fraction (below) of the carbonisation gas for Muswellbrook coal as a function of carbonisation time t.
In the second step, carbonisation gas was used to prereduce iron oxide pellets (Figures 3 and 7) for the iron bath smelting reduction process.
Therefore, some construction companies have switched from incineration to carbonisation and intended to use the charcoal not only in agriculture but also for humidity control in houses and buildings.
Some German research groups are so enthused by the promise of hydrothermal carbonisation that they're calling green coal a genuine alternative to current technologies such as solar cells and wind turbines - and are planning on building a green coal pilot plant this year.
In the pitch thus treated, Elbs cyclisation reaction takes places after several hours of heating at a temperature of about 370 [degrees]C; the aromaticity increases significantly, which is reflected in a high carbonisation residue (Blanco, 2000).
As expected, the C content in the solid fraction increased after the different carbonisation processes were applied to the corn stover feedstock (C 42.9% wt); the increase was greater with pyrolysis (C 74.3% wt) than with HTC (C 67.8% wt) (Table 1).