carbonization


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Related to carbonization: gasification

carbonization

[‚kär·bə·nə′zā·shən]
(chemistry)
The conversion of a carbon-containing substance to carbon or a carbon residue as the destructive distillation of coal by heat in the absence of air, yielding a solid residue with a higher percentage of carbon than the original coal; carried on for the production of coke and of fuel gas.
(geochemistry)
In the coalification process, the accumulation of residual carbon by changes in organic material and their decomposition products.
Deposition of a thin film of carbon by slow decay of organic matter underwater.
A process of converting a carbonaceous material to carbon by removal of other components.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The carbohydrates, such as, xylose [11, 12], glucose [13-15], fructose [16], sucrose [15, 16], cyclodextrin [17], cellulose [18] and starch [18] have been used to prepare functional carbon materials through hydrothermal carbonization. The as-prepared carbon microspheres (CMs) have a core-shell chemical structure consisting of a highly aromatic nucleus and a hydrophilic surface, which contains a variety of reactively hydrophilic oxygen chemical groups (carboxylic, carbonyl, ester, hydroxyl).
There was a sharp increase in the percentage removal of meal ions unto PMSAC at carbonization temperature ranges (300 - 400AdegC) with a slight decrease at 450AdegC due to damaged cells of the adsorption site which enhance the adsorption capacity.
Tang, "Study on the carbonization process in the fabrication of pebble fuel elements," Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.
Figure 8(d) shows that the difference in microhardness between the LG-LJ ITZ and the mortar matrix is relatively small, and the microhardness and ITZ width of the transition zone before and after carbonization are lower than those of the LG-XJ interface.
(2) Optimal Carbonization Environment and Carbonization Method.
In the case of HC, the major weight loss occurred at a temperature range of 200-400[degrees]C, and only one sharp peak at 335[degrees]C was detected in Figure 1(b), indicating that the biopolymer fractions especially hemicellulose were decomposed after the hydrothermal carbonization. Similar phenomenon was also found in other studies [44].
Rabbits sacrificed at 0, 1, and 2 hours were pooled for the statistical evaluation of the depth and width of the incisions, carbonization, and necrotic zones.
On the other hand, it should be mentioned that the next step, carbonization of the samples, is usually performed at temperatures higher than 600[degrees]C so that gelatin will most probably completely be degraded after the carbonization process.
The carbonization process is to enrich the carbon content and create initial porosity and the activation process helps in enhancing the pore structure.
When soybean was chemically activated after carbonization and tested for supercapacitor electrodes, gravimetric capacitance and volumetric capacitance of 260 F [g.sup.-1] and 210 F [cm.sup.-3], respectively, was obtained in [H.sub.2]S[O.sub.4] [67].
The colour changes that were observed during the heat treatment were from white to brown after stabilization and black after carbonization. The Ti[O.sub.2] particles of the PAN/Ti[O.sub.2]-EM nanofibres were dispersed fairly uniformly over the carbon nanofibres because the Ti[O.sub.2] nanoparticles were dispersed homogenously in the PAN solution before electrospinning.
After de carbonization, the apparent density of the charcoal was determined, through the volume and weight measurements of the specimens, and the gravimetric yield of carbonization by the reaction between the dry weight of charcoal and the absolutely dry weight of the specimen, before carbonization.