carboxymethylcellulose


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carboxymethylcellulose

[kär‚bäk·sē¦meth·əl ′sel·yə‚lōs]
(organic chemistry)
An acid ether derivative of cellulose used as a sodium salt; a white, odorless, bulky solid used as a stabilizer and emulsifier; negatively charged resin used in ion-exchange chromatography as a cation exchanger. Also known as cellulose gum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Group 1 patients received artificial tears (carboxymethylcellulose 0.5%) alone instilled three times daily, while Group 2: Received Artificial tears (carboxymethylcellulose 0.5%) instilled 3 times daily and cyclosporine (0.1%) instilled 2 times daily.
The pH profile for endo-[beta]-1,4-glucanase activity against carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC-Na) showed its optimum pH was 4.0 (Fig.3a).
"Factors on the preparation of Carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel and its degradation behavior in soil", Carbohyd polymer, 58: 185-189.
After incubation for 1 h, the virus inoculum was aspirated, and a carboxymethylcellulose overlay containing maintenance medium and the appropriate interferon concentration was added.
The treatment involved sequential addition of a highly cationic, linear polymer, poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (poly-DADMAC), followed by anionic carboxymethylcellulose (CMC).
Seprapack is a composite of chemically modified HA and CMC (carboxymethylcellulose) formed into a compressed wafer.
By 1980, the potentially life-threatening bacterial illness had reached its peak, and carboxymethylcellulose, polyacrylate rayon and polyester were pulled from the market.
Sepramesh[TM] Biosurgical Composite is comprised of polypropylene mesh coated with adhesion preventing materials, modified sodium hyaluronate (HA) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC).
CARBOXYMETHYLCELLULOSE (E461) can cause gut irritation in large quantities.
Starches, carboxymethylcellulose, and gums are sometimes added to egg products to prevent or limit syneresis, a process that occurs in cooked eggs because the gel (coagulum) formed on heating at excessively high temperature or due to cumulation of heat buildup becomes so firm that it squeezes liquid out, creating liquid and curds.
But in addition, diced fish or shrimp was incorporated into "food balls" gelled with carboxymethylcellulose, compressed onto the end of a monofilament line, and presented as described above.
The ink-jetting solution contained 12.5 g/L mercuric nitrate, 15.4 g/L hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) (Aldrich), 30.0 g/L carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) (Aqualon), 1.0 g/L hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) (Fluka), and 50 mmol/L KCI.