carbro process

carbro process

[′kär‚brō ‚präs·əs]
(graphic arts)
A photographic method of making carbon prints in which tanning of pigmented gelatin occurs in a special bleach bath, and the gelatin yields prints made on bromide paper.
References in periodicals archive ?
A particularly stunning inclusion in Frida Kahlo's Garden is a set of 1939 photographs of Frida posing amidst her outdoor plants created using a three-color carbro process by Nickolas Muray, one of her important lovers.
Having more or less failed at cinematography, Outerbridge couldn't afford to let his hard-won edge in photography slip away as well, so he started familiarizing himself with the color carbro process. A time-consuming, subtractive procedure that alternates carbon-based pigments with silver bromide (hence "car-bro"), the technique had been around on both continents since before the war but didn't come into its own until the early 1930s.
By the start of WWII, his numerous commercial photographs, many of them front covers, included: Command Performance (1936), illustrating an article on figurines; The Potting Shed (1937), a Fischli & Weiss-like ad for Max Schling Seedsmen, Inc.; and such remarkable pieces as Kandinsky (1937), a Cinzano ad in which a darkroom timer, yellow pigment paper and folding measuring stick refer directly to the carbro process (as well as to the Russian artist's interest in color symbolism).