carburetion

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carburetion

[‚kär·bə′rā·shən]
(chemical engineering)
The process of enriching a gas by adding volatile carbon compounds, such as hydrocarbons, to it, as in the manufacture of carbureted water gas.
(mechanical engineering)
The process of mixing fuel with air in a carburetor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carburetion

The process by which air and fuel vapors are mixed in suitable proportions and the supply of the mixture is then regulated.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Two-stroke carbureted engines are preferred over four-stroke engines (a cleaner burning engine) for many reasons, but largely because two-stroke engines have the potential to pack about twice the power into the same space.
Along with its new EFI V-twins, which have displacements of 653 or 720 cc and outputs from 20 to 27 hp, the company can cover a broad spectrum of industrial applications with either fuel-injected or carbureted engines, depending on the application and cost considerations.
These new two-strokes still release more HCs than four-strokes, but like their dirtier carbureted brothers, they are lighter, faster, and less expensive than four-strokes.
The front brake pads were visible through the slots in the 12-in, wheels, which made it easy to determine when new ones were needed, and the carbureted pushrod motor--which produced a claimed 88 hp- was bog-simple.
The EDGE Engine allows maximum engine horsepower to be maintained at higher rpm's than conventional carbureted engines.
This marks the first ban on carbureted two-stroke motors in the US, and it sets a precedent that will have far-reaching implications.
Whatever the time of day or season, the atmosphere's lucency is compromised by leaded, ineptly carbureted automobile exhaust.
Because fuel injected engines regulate fuel delivery more precisely than do carbureted engines, the fuel injected models produce lower exhaust emissions.
In 1970, one basic engine-drive train technology (a V8 engine, longitudinally mounted, water cooled, carbureted, hooked up to a three-speed automatic transmission with rear wheel drive) accounted for close to 80 percent of all automobile production in the United States.
During cold starts a butterfly choke valve was once located ahead of the carburetor to enrich the airfuel ratio in compensation for inadequate vaporization of the carbureted liquid fuel in the cold engine.
The bottom of the case is stamped with an airport traffic light signal guide, the cruising altitudes for VFR and IFR flying, emergency transponder codes and a basic emergency checklist for a carbureted engine failure.