carcinogen

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Related to carcinogenicity: mutagenicity, genotoxicity

carcinogen:

see cancercancer,
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to body mechanisms that limit cell growth.
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carcinogen

[kär′sin·ə·jən]
(medicine)
Any agent that incites development of a carcinoma or any other sort of malignancy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carcinogen

Pathol any substance that produces cancer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The genetic toxicology testing battery has been designed to be highly sensitive in predicting chemical carcinogenicity. The genetic toxicology testing battery detects 93% of carcinogens (Kirkland et al.
The report deals with only a fraction of the potentially carcinogenic agents found in today's workplaces, most of which have sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals but limited evidence for carcinogenicity in humans.
KEY WORDS: animal, carcinogen, carcinogenesis, epidemiology, human, IARC, mechanisms of carcinogenicity, occupational.
The central hypothesis underlying our study design was that the long-term carcinogenicity of chemicals can be accurately predicted from gene expression profiles of short-term in vitro models.
Pharmaceutical company BioPharmX Corporation (NYSE American:BPMX) revealed on Thursday that the US Food and Drug Administration has waived its requirement for several years of non-clinical research of dermal carcinogenicity study for BPX-01 normally required for its review.
The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies talc that contains asbestos as "carcinogenic to humans," while talc not containing asbestos is "not classifiable as to carcinogenicity in humans." Perineal use of talc-based body powder is classified as "possibly carcinogenic to humans."
Alternative approaches range from the individual test methods (e.g., the cell transformation assay for carcinogenicity and the zebrafish and embryonic stem cell embryotoxicity tests for reproductive toxicity) to animal reduction approaches such as the International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) strategy for carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals and the extended-one-generation reproductive toxicity study.
Their topics include alternative methods in haematopoietic stem cell toxicology, the high-throughput screening of toxic chemicals on neural stem cells, toxicological risk assessment: a proposed assay platform using stem and progenitor cell differentiation in response to environmental toxicants, pesticides and hematopoietic stem cells, distributed stem cell kinetotoxicity: a new concept to account for the human carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic environmental toxicants, and cancer stem cells as therapeutic targets.
Carcinogenicity of drinking coffee, mate, and very hot beverages.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asked the National Toxicology Program (NTP) to conduct toxicology and carcinogenicity tests linked to exposure to "radio frequency radiation emitted by wireless communication devices, especially cellphones." To test for its potential carcinogenicity on humans, rats were exposed to radiation for periods of up to two years.