card vote


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card vote

Brit a vote by delegates, esp at a trade-union conference, in which each delegate's vote counts as a vote by all his constituents
References in periodicals archive ?
MenTor: Gary Barlow Known for: His crippling nerves, getting the public's wild card vote and Tulisa's charge that he is cheesier than Stilton.
But for their councillors they cannot unless there is a card vote [which happens infrequently].
Delegates voted on a show of hands unanimously in favour of a strike ballot and again in a card vote showing 51,849 supporting a ballot and none against.
Dembrow countered that SB 932 and the drivers' card vote are two "separate issues.
LAST week the City Council meeting was attended by new chief executive, Ged Fitzgerald who, when calling a card vote, called councillors by their surnames.
More than 700 people turned up to view proposals drawn up by two separate developers, with 77% of those who took part in a card vote favouring the MKP scheme.
The reforms were backed by almost 85 per cent of delegates after a card vote.
In a card vote they instead endorsed a statement by Labour's ruling National Executive Committee, recognising British forces would stay as long as the Iraqi government wanted them to.
The result of a card vote taken yesterday and announced today showed 63.
The former Atomic Kitten, who was criticised for giving Susan McFadden her wild card vote, said her sister- in-law was 12 times better than any of the other females.
The party had been widely expected to lose a crunch vote on local government and housing policy document, through the use by big unions of their card vote.
A motion to end the exclusivity agreement with Knowsley Borough Council and Tesco over the Kirkby plans, plus a demand to re-consider development of Goodison Park, or find a new site in the city, was defeated on a card vote that ensured the club's major shareholders, including Kenwright, would prevail.
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