cardiac

(redirected from cardiac compression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

cardiac

1. of or relating to the heart
2. of or relating to the portion of the stomach connected to the oesophagus
3. a person with a heart disorder
4. Obsolete a drug that stimulates the heart muscle

cardiac

[′kärd·ē‚ak]
(anatomy)
Of, pertaining to, or situated near the heart.
Of or pertaining to the cardia of the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
sup][3] If the lesion was complicated only with a large amount of pericardial effusion, the fetal pericardio-amniotic shunting could be made to release the cardiac compression.
Chronologically speaking, the "electro-pneumatic machine" developed by Harkins and Bramson (20) in 1961; the "portable pneumatic pump" developed by Nachlas and Siedband (21) in 1962; the "Beck-Rand external cardiac compression machine" developed by Safar et al.
Pre hospital recognition of extent of cardiac injury is important as sometimes resuscitative measures like large volume fluid infusion and external cardiac compressions can contribute to worsened outcome.
This is most often attributed to a report by Criley, Blaufuss and Kissel on self-administered cough-induced cardiac compressions.
When VT developed, the surgeons commenced tightening the sublaminar wires as quickly as possible in case cardiac compression became necessary.
That is, the performance of external cardiac compression with the following characteristics: continuous, uninterrupted, push hard, push fast, complete chest recoil, and equal time for compression and release.
I think there are really good data that [show] we're not doing a great job on cardiac compression.
Triggered by compression of the great vessels and cardiac compression from large tumors, it is a strong predictor of fetal death and may lead to "maternal mirror syndrome," a potentially devastating complication in which the mother develops the same symptoms as her critically ill fetus.
After realising what he had done, Skinner said he attempted to save the dog by trying mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and cardiac compression.
Another research study found that a modified AT-101 as a stand alone CPR device was superior to closed chest cardiac compression in terms of post-resuscitation cardiac function despite significantly less myocardial blood flow during CPR with the AT-101.
The large patient caseload -- estimated at 5 million Americans and growing -- and progressive nature of the disease have generated substantial interest in new, device-based technologies, including rhythm management, mechanical cardiac support, ventricular reconstruction, device-based diuretic therapy, and cardiac compression and counterpulsation, among others.