cardiac glycoside


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Related to cardiac glycoside: digitalis, digoxin

cardiac glycoside

[‚kärd·ē‚ak ′glī·kə‚sīd]
(biochemistry)
A class of naturally occurring glycosides that exhibit the ability to strengthen the contraction of heart muscles.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiac glycosides are chemically similar to digoxin, and are distributed throughout the plant, either fresh or dried (LANGFORD & BOOR, 1996; SOTO-BLANCO et al., 2006).
Scheiner-Bobis, "Endogenous and exogenous cardiac glycosides: their roles in hypertension, salt metabolism, and cell growth," American Journal of Physiology.
Heart Failure, Atrial Arrythmias, and Cardiac Glycosides' Effects on the Diseased Heart
(12) In summary, cardiotoxic plant poisonings may cause serious dysrhythmias and death and will require intensive care management with combinations of gastrointestinal decontamination with oral-activated charcoal, intravenous vasopressor support, anti-arrhythmics, temporary pacemaker or temporary cardiopulmonary bypass, and few specific antidotes, with the exception of digoxin-specific Fab in cases of confirmed cardiac glycoside poisonings.
This finding is particularly exciting because specific up-regulation of a proapoptotic factor, FasL, by a cardiac glycoside has not previously been described.
Currently, heart failure patients are treated with diuretics such as furosemide to reduce water volume; cardiac glycosides such as digoxin, which produce a positive inotropic effect in cardiac muscles to improve cardiac output; inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; and medications that block [beta]-adrenergic receptors to the deleterious effects of neurohormones.
The kernel of its fruit contains various toxic principles; the important one is Cerberin, a cardiac glycoside almost similar to digitalis in its toxicity.
(5,6) Digoxin is a cardiac glycoside that inhibits Na/K-ATPase, thus causing a transient increase in intracellular sodium and then an increase in calcium by way of the sodium-calcium exchange mechanism.
Figure 1 shows the content of cardiac glycoside, calculated as % digitoxin, in the various Thevetia seed meal samples and the results showed a marked reduction in glycoside content irrespective of detoxification method employed.
(2) describe studies that support the possibility of de novo biosynthesis, in the adrenal, of a material whose overall physicochemical, immunocrossreactive, and chromatographic characteristics are indistinguishable from those of the cardiac glycoside (CG) digoxin and its dihydro analog (in which the lactone ring is fully saturated).