cardiac

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cardiac

1. of or relating to the heart
2. of or relating to the portion of the stomach connected to the oesophagus
3. a person with a heart disorder
4. Obsolete a drug that stimulates the heart muscle
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cardiac

[′kärd·ē‚ak]
(anatomy)
Of, pertaining to, or situated near the heart.
Of or pertaining to the cardia of the stomach.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiac preload decreases as well, due to the impaired diastolic function and the decreased blood volume [54, 103].
supine) likely influenced venous return, cardiac preload, and peripheral resistance that can influence SV.
Both exposures to +Gz and anti-G measures result in repetitive intrathoracic hydrostatic changes, which can cause significant changes in cardiac preload and afterload.
Cardiac output is regulated by four factors: heart rate, cardiac contractility and cardiac preload and afterload.
Should we stop using the determination of central venous pressure as a way to estimate cardiac preload?
* Similarly, the tendency for developing CCF is dependent upon the size of the fistula (and therefore the degree of the shunt which causes an increase in the cardiac preload) and the ability to compensate for this (which is related to the individual's pre-existing cardiac reserve).
(1,3-5) High-output cardiac failure is the result of a steep increase in the cardiac preload owing to the steal phenomenon.
These drugs have multiple mechanisms of benefit, including acting on the midbrain to reduce the sensation of shortness of breath, decreasing oxygen consumption by reducing muscle activity, suppressing cough, reducing chemoreceptor sensitivity to carbon dioxide, and decreasing cardiac preload and sympathetic tone.
These drugs act on the midbrain to reduce the sensation of shortness of breath, decrease oxygen consumption by reducing muscle activity, suppress cough, reduce chemoreceptor sensitivity to carbon dioxide, and decrease cardiac preload and sympathetic tone.