cardiopulmonary

(redirected from cardiorespiratory)
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cardiopulmonary

[¦kärd·ē·ō′pu̇l·mə‚ner·ē]
(physiology)
Pertaining to the heart and lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet cardiorespiratory fitness is the one risk factor not routinely checked at doctor visits -- unless you request it.
He warned that cardiorespiratory arrest was the most common cause of the sudden cardiac problem in people older than 35.
"Future preventive initiatives should include both nutrition education and cardiorespiratory fitness components and be delivered to children as young as six." Researchers also found senior infant and fourth-class boys and girls were found to be eating intakes of fruit and vegetables, fibre, calcium and iron below recommended levels.
Previous studies have been too small to ascertain whether all of these subgroups profit from improving their cardiorespiratory fitness.
Related to the various functional mechanisms of the body, cardiorespiratory refers to the uptake and transport of oxygen, while the musculoskeletal system is involved in the maximum utilization of oxygen.
On these grounds, the present study is fully justified, as we believe that a faithful picture of physical fitness aspects (morphological, cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular) directly related to the state of health of different military police subgroups will establish the relevance of exercise programs targeting this specific population to optimize the performance of their social service tasks, and thus contribute to improve the public safety.
The benefits of increasing aerobic cardiorespiratory fitness were substantial even after adjusting for basal risk factors.
nicotine patches or electronic cigarettes, are not a safe alternative to cigarettes during pregnancy, because exposure to nicotine by any route may be harmful to a baby's cardiorespiratory function and increase the risk of SIDS.
Ross was chair of a 2016 American Heart Association Committee that issued a report showing that low cardiorespiratory fitness is a stronger predictor of death than smoking, high cholesterol, type II diabetes, or high blood pressure.
Current international guidelines for cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation programmes include a significant exercise component (Alison et al., 2017; Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Cardiac Rehabilitation, 2015); historically exercise has traditionally been prescribed by cardiorespiratory physiotherapists (Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Cardiac Rehabilitation, 2018; Best Practice Advocacy Centre New Zealand, 2017).
HIGHER CARDIORESPIRATORY fitness at mid-life appears linked to a lower risk of depression in later life.
* Greater grip strength and cardiorespiratory fitness lowered the risks of ischemic stroke and heart failure; grip strength was also associated with a reduced risk of hemorrhagic stroke.