caring


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caring

the practice or profession of providing social or medical care
References in periodicals archive ?
As caregivers, we must pay attention to our own biases or methods of caring. Sometimes these biases can influence the way we care for others, as well as our decisions regarding how care should be delivered.
"In these early years, children learn about themselves and the world, their identity, what to value, and what not to value through their interaction with a few caring adults," explains Abbey Griffin, director of the nonprofit group Zero to Three.
Some feminists' oppose encouraging family care (as would be the case if cash were allowed to pay family members), but others value womens' caring nature, accept that caring opportunities/obligations will present themselves at various points in peoples' lives, and focus on how fairly to support caring with adequate programs (Baldwin & Twigg, 1991; Evers, 1994; Johanss0n & Sund-strom, 1994; Lingsom, 1994).
Despite the flurry of dutiful, largely obeisant press coverage, it is hardly news when politicians surround themselves with children and bravely pledge, as did the first lady, to "make it clear that we want American parents to succeed at the most important task they have, caring for the next generation." The real scoop is that the vast majority of parents are careful consumers of child care, are satisfied with their arrangements, and are likely to view increased government involvement or oversight with great skepticism.
And we must look beyond care of the individual patient, share our knowledge and collaborate with other stakeholders in caring for the population as a whole.