carob

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carob

(kăr`əb), leguminous evergreen tree (Ceratonia siliqua) of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), native to Mediterranean regions but cultivated in other warm climates, including Florida and California. The large red pods have been used for food for animal and man since prehistoric times. The pods and their extracted content have numerous common names, e.g., locust bean gum and St.-John's-bread—the latter from the belief that they may have been the "locust" eaten by John the Baptist in the wilderness (Mark 1.6). Carob is used also for curing tobacco, in papermaking, and as a stabilizer in food products. It has been claimed that the seeds were the original of the carat, the measure of weight for precious jewels and metals. Carob is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
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carob

carob

Use pliers to open seed pods to remove hard stone-like seeds, then grind up the pods into powder and mix in drinks as chocolate substitute, or simply chew the pods raw and spit out the seeds. Makes a great survival food. Tastes similar to chocolate, but with less fat and caffeine. Has mild binding properties so you don't go to the bathroom too much.

Carob

 

(Ceratonia siliqua), also St. John’s-bread or algarroba, a tree of the family Caesalpiniaceae. The carob reaches a height of 10 m and has a broad crown. The evergreen leaves are compact and pinnate, and the tiny flowers are gathered in racemes. The calyx is plain and deciduous; there is no corolla. The carob is cultivated in the Mediterranean region, and in some places it grows wild. In the USSR it is occasionally grown in the moist subtropics of Georgia and Azerbaijan. Carob pods, brown in color and indehiscent, are about 10–25 cm long, 2–4 cm wide, and 0.5–1 cm thick. In addition to seeds, they contain a sweet, juicy pulp with a sugar content of approximately 50 percent. The fruits are cultivated for use as food (candy or a coffee substitute) and as forage for cattle. The juice can be squeezed from the pods and used as a sweet syrup or as a raw material in the production of alcohol. The hard, flat, brown seeds served in ancient times as a measure of weight.

carob

an evergreen leguminous Mediterranean tree, Ceratonia siliqua, with compound leaves and edible pods
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the seedlings to which the nanny goat helped herself was the carob by her house.
In past years I had neighbors collect my carob crop and received a share of the delicious and healing molasses extracted from it.
The university is currently negotiating with local and international companies to produce new innovative carob products.
A support group of carob experts help the team and are preparing a guide on how to grow the trees which can be followed by all those who want to cooperate with the university in future.
These will include a carob liqueur and an improved version of the first alcoholic drink produced a year ago, Ceratonia.
Beyond these, the rector said UCy was negotiating with local and foreign firms with the aim of striking deals to create innovative products made from carob.
Farmers and scientists alike are interested in the cultivation of 40,000 carob trees planned by the University of Cyprus, a senior university officer said on Thursday.
In infants, carob is used to treat vomiting , retching cough , and diarorrhea.
and carob was considered as 'the black gold of Cyprus' since it was very important for the local economy as the island was making huge exports," said Menelaos Stavrinides, assistant professor at CUT and national coordinator of the Agrolife project which is co-funded by the EU's LIFE+ programme.
For example, they have been inspired to utilise a technique seen elsewhere to protect carob trees in Anogyra from mice, by placing metal shields on the trunks of the trees which prevents access to the foliage and branches.
Historically and culturally, the carob is significant for Cyprus," said Menelaos Stavrinides, an assistant professor at Cyprus' University of Technology and national coordinator of the project.