carrageen


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

carrageen:

see seaweedseaweed,
name commonly used for the multicellular marine algae. Simpler forms, consisting of one cell (e.g., the diatom) or of a few cells, are not generally called seaweeds; these tiny plants help to make up plankton.
..... Click the link for more information.
; RhodophytaRhodophyta
, phylum (division) of the kingdom Protista consisting of the photosynthetic organisms commonly known as red algae. Most of the world's seaweeds belong to this group.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
Enlarge picture
irish moss

irish moss

Full of electrolyte minerals, calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. A good all around thing to consume when recovering from serious illness because of all the things it has. It's mucilaginous compounds help you detoxify, boost metabolism and strengthen hair, skin and nails. Traditionally used for low sex drive, bronchitis, goiter, thyroid and gland issues. Great food thickener for soups, desserts, pies, toppings, and making raw vegan cheese.

Carrageen

 

(also, Irish moss), the commercial name for the red seaweeds Gigartina mamillosa and Chindrus crispus, which occur along the coasts of the North Atlantic (C. crispus is also found along the Kola Penninsula and in the Far East). The principal component is slime (56-79 percent), which is composed of polysaccharides and swells considerably in water. After it has been boiled and subsequently cooled, carrageen congeals into a gelatinous mass. This seaweed, which is dried during processing, is used in the textile industry for sizing material, in the food industry for clarifying beer, and in the paper industry for preparing suspensions and solutions. It is also used to prevent the settling of suspensions.

carrageen

[′kar·ə‚gēn]
(botany)
Chondrus crispus. A cartilaginous red algae harvested in the northern Atlantic as a source of carrageenan. Also known as Irish moss; pearl moss.

carrageen

, carragheen, carageen
an edible red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, of North America and N Europe
References in periodicals archive ?
The Queen's 2011 visit also boosted the company's profile when she was served a dessert of carrageen cream pudding at Dublin Castle - and she has been a fan ever since.
The carrageen seaweed has natural thickening properties so make sure the liquid is not thick as it will have an off consistency when syphoned
Dishes include nettle soup, Dublin coddle, rack of Wicklow lamb glazed with Boyne Valley honey, Irish whiskey mustard with gratinated crabmeat, Limerick gammon with Colcannon potato, rhubarb tart with gooseberry sherbet, currant and apple roly-poly and Carrageen Moss flan.
Voucher valid for 30% off full retail when you buy Orange & Jasmine, Sweet Clementine & Grapefruit or Carrageen Moss.
A traditional stabilizer used to be arrowroot, but now agar-agar, carrageen, starches, gelatin, or even pectin are common natural-based stabilizers.
The meal included cottage broth, boiled bacon and carrageen souffle, washed down by bottles of champagne and the Irish "Wild Geese" wine Chateau Lynch Bages.
The effect of the two extracts on pentobarbitone-sleeping time, motor activity, sensorimotor coordination, carrageen induced inflammation, and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia has also been investigated.
aspera on carrageenan-induced paw edema, freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritis and carrageenan-induced peritonitis Group Dose Carrageen an-induced mg/kg, paw edema p.