carry-over


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carry-over

[′kar·ē ‚ō·vər]
(chemical engineering)
Unwanted liquid or solid material carried by the overhead effluent from a fractionating column, absorber, or reaction vessel.
(hydrology)
The portion of the stream flow during any month or year derived from precipitation in previous months or years.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2013 list includes six carry-overs from 2012, though nations like the Bahamas, Chile, Serbia and Argentina fell off for declining in environmental protection.
I always reconsider the list of carry-overs from the past week.
With some of the answers you will need to think outside the box and use carry-overs. For example, 236 + 236 = 472.
Getting married for a second time often places more demands on people, as they have carry-overs of memories, habits and expectations from their first marriage.
The engine line-up is a mixture of familiar carry-overs and new arrivals, with biofuelcompatible engines also on the agenda.
The non-diffusive and chemically resistant materials used in the optics and operational controls, and the gap-free construction of the sensors, prevent bacterial carry-overs. Moreover, the enclosed housing technology and expanded temperature range from -20[degrees]C to +70[degrees]C combine to ensure long-lasting functionality.
* The corporation being acquired has unused net operating losses, capital losses or tax credit carry-overs.
Ties on a hole make for carry-overs. Whoever wins the most yards by the end of the day wins the match.
1374, loss of net operating loss carry-overs, and the inventory LIFO recapture tax.