carsickness

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carsickness

[′kär‚sik·nəs]
(medicine)
Motion sickness resulting from acceleratory movements of a train or automobile.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you have a dog who gets carsick even after all that, try giving her a ginger snap or two before the ride, and/or ask your vet for medication that will help calm her stomach.
All this history that reached right down to me as a seven-, eight-, nine-year-old girl, slightly carsick on the ride each Sunday morning to Hebrew School in Portland, Maine.
The chocolate lasted longer, but all four boys were carsick on and off for days.
He doesn't mention the time he got carsick on a Chicago expressway, minutes before we arrived at our ritzy relatives' Winnetka home.
Before you leave on a long road trip, try shorter trips with your pet to test out if they get carsick; and if so, consider the option of anti-nausea medication for your pet.
When I lost the sight in one eye, my ophthalmologist said I'd no longer get airsick or carsick. He said a NASA astronaut discovered that by closing one eye, the dizziness from the effects of being weightless went away.
carsick from backseat journeys through the mountains that dipped and
Carsick by John Waters Publisher: Corsair Price: Hardback PS16.99, ebook PS8.54 VETEREN cult film director John Waters is the first to admit that a book about hitch-hiking isn't the most inspirational of synopses.
CARSICK by John Waters is published in hardback by Corsair, priced PS16.99 (ebook PS8.54).
8 CARSICK: JOHN WATERS HITCHHIKES ACROSS AMERICA (FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX, 2014) I grew up in the suburbs of Baltimore, in Towson, Maryland.
"Carsick isn't about the general challenge of hitchhiking from Baltimore to San Francisco, it's about John Waters being John Waters--super-friendly, outgoing, extremely comfortable with being gay, and a little nervous about being out in the wild.
8, 2011), http://popupchinese.com/lessons/sinica/the-china-rock-podcast (featuring a panel discussion of the China music scene in which China rock music experts Michael Pettis and Archie Hamilton noted that popular Chinese alternative rock band Carsick Cars had recently earned 90,000 RMB (about $14,400) in less than two months performing at festivals and concerts, and another "top rock band" booked a festival for a fee of "well into six figures [RMB]").