case sensitivity


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Related to case sensitivity: Case insensitive

case sensitivity

(text)
Whether a text matching operation distinguishes upper-case (capital) letters from lower case (is "case sensitive") or not ("case insensitive").

Case in file names should be preserved (for readability) but ignored when matching (so the user doesn't have to get it right). MS-DOS does not preserve case in file names, Unix preserves case and matches are case sensitive.

Any decent text editor will allow the user to specify whether or not text searches should be case sensitive.

Case sensitivity is also relevant in programming (most programming languages distiguish between case in the names of identifiers), and addressing (Internet domain names are case insensitive but RFC 822 local mailbox names are case sensitive).

Case insensitive operations are sometimes said to "fold case", from the idea of folding the character code table so that upper and lower case letters coincide. The alternative "smash case" is more likely to be used by someone who considers this behaviour a misfeature or in cases where one case is actually permanently converted to the other.

"MS-DOS will automatically smash case in the names of all the files you create".
References in periodicals archive ?
While testing plato, I quickly learned that there is a critical difference between the file systems of Linux and Windows NT: case sensitivity. The Windows NT file system (NTFS) is not case-sensitive, but the Linux file system (ext2/3) is, as are most UNIX file systems.
On the third or fourth page of the introductory screen is a data box that enables you to enter a word or phrase, use Boolean operators (AND, OR, or NOT), and specify case sensitivity.