cassava


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Related to cassava: cassava starch, yam

cassava

(kəsä`və) or

manioc

(măn`ēŏk), name for many species of the genus Manihot of the family Euphorbiaceae (spurgespurge
, common name for members of the Euphorbiaceae, a family of herbs, shrubs, and trees of greatly varied structure and almost cosmopolitan distribution, although most species are tropical. In the United States the family is most common in the Southeast.
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 family). The roots, which resemble sweet potatoes and are eaten in much the same way, yield cassava starch, a staple food in the tropics. The cassava is native to Amazonia and has long been cultivated there by the indigenous population. It is now a major food source in many parts of the moist lowland tropics, particularly in Africa. Most cassava flour is made from M. esculenta, sometimes called bitter cassava because of the presence in the raw roots of prussic acid in sufficient quantities to be deadly. This poison is dispelled by long cooking or (for flour) pressing. Some cultivated varieties with a lesser acid content, called sweet cassava, are edible raw as well as boiled and can be used for fodder. It is important to process cassava as quickly as possible after harvesting; enzymes in the root will cause deterioration of the final product if processing is not completed within 48 hours. Cassava roots are also fermented to make an alcoholic beverage, are the source of tapiocatapioca
, widely used starchy food, obtained from the fleshy root of the bitter cassava. Tapioca is sold in flake or flour form and as the pellet pearl tapioca. Tapioca flour is widely used in place of wheat flour in regions where it is grown, e.g.
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, or Brazilian arrowroot, and are utilized in other ways, e.g., for cotton sizing and laundry starch. Cassava is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Euphorbiales, family Euphorbiaceae.

cassava

[kə′sav·ə]
(botany)
Manihot esculenta. A shrubby perennial plant grown for its starchy, edible tuberous roots. Also known as manihot; manioc.

cassava

any tropical euphorbiaceous plant of the genus Manihot, esp the widely cultivated American species M. esculenta (or utilissima) (bitter cassava) and M. dulcis (sweet cassava)
References in periodicals archive ?
Commerce Ministry spokesman Long Kemvichet said the company had shared with the ministry initial plans for the first factory, which is set to have the capacity to produce 100,000 tonnes of tapioca a year - a haul that would require 500,000 tonnes of raw cassava.
Cassava has long been the country's number-one staple crop, and is key to keeping hunger at bay, they believe.
They were heading back to town from the farm and had loaded the motorbike with cassava when they saw some Fulani herdsmen coming towards them.
The conventional cassava takes 10 years to breed, but scientists hope the new variety will take half the time.
He observes that although the harvest of the cassava is ongoing in Gbarpolu County, the organization is in dire need of cassava processing machines which can only be possible through the help of donor organizations and the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA).
ARMM was the top producing region in the country, accounting for more than 44 percent of the national cassava output during the period.
The GMD also allayed fears of any possible negative impact of the plant on the supply of cassava-based foods for human consumption, stressing that the cassava that would be used for the biofuel project was a special breed that would not be in competition for human consumption or interfere with the activities of farmers cultivating other breeds of cassava or indeed other crops.
On average, the cassava root processing results in approximately 30% of wastewater, which is improperly eliminated, contaminating the soil and groundwater (Almeida, Silva, Lima, Almeida, & Zacharias, 2009).
2 These young cassava plants have been genetically engineered to process sunlight more efficiently.
Though cassava is widely adapted to a variety of environmental conditions, it's reported that the adaptability of most varieties is narrow and shows large genotype by environment interaction (GEI) effects (Akinwale et al.
Cassava has also been found to be more resistant to mold invasion, a characteristic that makes it advantageous in duck rearing.