cassowary

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cassowary

(kăs`əwâr'ē), common name for a flightless, swift-running, pugnacious forest bird of Australia and the Malay Archipelago, smaller than the ostrichostrich,
common name for a large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) of Africa and parts of SW Asia, allied to the rhea, the emu and the extinct moa. It is the largest of living birds; some males reach a height of 8 ft (244 cm) and weigh from 200 to 300 lb (90–135
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 and emuemu
or emeu
, common name for a large, flightless bird of Australia, related to the cassowary and the ostrich. There is only one living species, Dromaius novaehollandiae. It is 5 to 6 ft (150–180 cm) tall and a very swift runner.
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. The plumage is dark and glossy and the head and neck unfeathered, wattled, and brilliantly colored, with variations in the coloring in different species. The head bears a horny crest. The female is larger than the male, though both sexes are similar in color. They are monogamous and nest in shallow nests of leaves on the ground in forests. Only the male incubates the female's three to six dark-green eggs. Cassowaries are primarily nocturnal. Their diet consists mainly of fruits and berries, although some eat insects and small animals. Cassowaries are notoriously vicious and have attacked and killed men with their sharp, spikelike toenails. They are fast runners, attaining speeds up to 30 mi (48 km) per hr. Cassowaries are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Struthioniformes, family Casuariidae.

cassowary

[′kas·ə‚wer·ē]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of three species of large, heavy, flightless birds composing the family Casuariidae in the order Casuariiformes.

cassowary

any large flightless bird of the genus Casuarius, inhabiting forests in NE Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands, having a horny head crest, black plumage, and brightly coloured neck and wattles: order Casuariiformes (see ratite)
References in periodicals archive ?
Only then can a sustainable tourism industry support the future of Mission Beach, the community and our beautiful cassowaries.
The organisation Rainforest Rescue recently reported that local research (by Les Moore) suggests population estimates of cassowaries in Mission Beach and other locations may have been overestimated by six times the real number because of small survey areas.
Reciprocal ecosystem impact and behavioural interactions between cassowaries, Casuarius casuarius, and humans, Homo sapiens: Exploring the natural-human interface and its implications for endangered species recovery in North Queensland, Australia.
As his father-in-law roasts all the pigs he owns to celebrate the giving away of his daughter, this young man throws into the potlatch feast all the tusks of wild boars, the beaks of cassowaries with whom he has contended, the claws a nd plumes of eagles, and shells he has braved long treks down the slippery paths of the dangerous jungle to obtain from alien people who plunge into the shark-patrolled ocean for them.
From the inland region of Daudai (Papua), the `bush' peoples supplied bird of paradise plumes, cassowaries, parrots, objects made from cassowary bones, bows, arrows, garden foods and gamoda (Piper methysticum; kava).
The West classifies bats as mammals and cassowaries as birds; Karam classifies (flightless) cassowaries as animals and (flying) bats as birds.
He found that the high loads of sediment had indeed destroyed riverside gardens, depleted fish stocks and had a negative impact on other species such as turtles and cassowaries.
Because of the lodge design, he visitor catches a rare glimpse into the wondrous world of tree palms, possums, iridescent blue Ulysses butterflies and hard-to-spot cassowaries.
Almost 800 species of trees are found in the dense jungles, along with 130 species of birds, such as the brightly colored, noisy pitta with its characteristic "walk-to-work' whistle, parrots, warblers, robins, cockatoos, and the flightless cassowaries, which sometimes stand more than five feet tall and which can kick a person to death with huge toes tipped with degger-like nails.
Chapter 1, In the Rainforest, traces Beehler's initial encounter with the rainforests of Papua New Guinea (eastern New Guinea) in 1975, brought there by the allure of birds of paradise, bowerbirds, honeyeaters, and cassowaries.
The full list of species that need to be registered covers chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, guinea fowl, partridges, pheasants, quail, pigeons reared for meat, cassowaries, emus, ostriches, rheas and kiwis.