cassowary

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cassowary

(kăs`əwâr'ē), common name for a flightless, swift-running, pugnacious forest bird of Australia and the Malay Archipelago, smaller than the ostrichostrich,
common name for a large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) of Africa and parts of SW Asia, allied to the rhea, the emu and the extinct moa. It is the largest of living birds; some males reach a height of 8 ft (244 cm) and weigh from 200 to 300 lb (90–135
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 and emuemu
or emeu
, common name for a large, flightless bird of Australia, related to the cassowary and the ostrich. There is only one living species, Dromaius novaehollandiae. It is 5 to 6 ft (150–180 cm) tall and a very swift runner.
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. The plumage is dark and glossy and the head and neck unfeathered, wattled, and brilliantly colored, with variations in the coloring in different species. The head bears a horny crest. The female is larger than the male, though both sexes are similar in color. They are monogamous and nest in shallow nests of leaves on the ground in forests. Only the male incubates the female's three to six dark-green eggs. Cassowaries are primarily nocturnal. Their diet consists mainly of fruits and berries, although some eat insects and small animals. Cassowaries are notoriously vicious and have attacked and killed men with their sharp, spikelike toenails. They are fast runners, attaining speeds up to 30 mi (48 km) per hr. Cassowaries are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Struthioniformes, family Casuariidae.

cassowary

[′kas·ə‚wer·ē]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of three species of large, heavy, flightless birds composing the family Casuariidae in the order Casuariiformes.

cassowary

any large flightless bird of the genus Casuarius, inhabiting forests in NE Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands, having a horny head crest, black plumage, and brightly coloured neck and wattles: order Casuariiformes (see ratite)
References in periodicals archive ?
When pressed on why cassowaries feature so much in these stories, some would elaborate that there is too little meat on a cassowary for all to receive a share, with some adding that it is usually larger clans that break up for whatever reason, meaning that there are more men to feed.
The Anganen mainly procure cassowaries through trade with those to their south such as the lowland Foi of Lake Kutubu.
While the Anganen feed cassowaries food potentially fit for human consumption, this lacks the sense of sharing typical of that between humans and pigs and dogs.
I stress older cassowaries because, as Healey (1985:156) notes for the Maring, it is possible to imprint young chicks on their human carers, almost excessively so in comparison with pigs.
Where live cassowaries feature most in exchange histories is in warfare compensation, the living bird substituting for the death of that which it symbolises, the warrior.
In many respects wildmen may be likened to those who engage in rawa who effectively mirror the cassowaries potential of going from tame to wild, albeit in a culturally prescribed manner.
Lederman (1985:183-4) discusses the competitive exchange of temol, and notes in one event, victory went to those who killed six cassowaries while their opponents preferred to give the birds away live to exchange partners.
It took a number of weeks for the two men to amass cassowaries and pigs in a quantity they felt confident was sufficient for victory.
The animals' throats were cut, and they may have been disembowelled, but the entrails were not cleaned, nor were the bristles of pigs singed off or the cassowaries plucked.
In other contexts the Anganen waste very little of cassowaries or pigs.
We will continue to put measures in place targeted to achieve the best possible results for the protection of cassowaries.
The most notable of these is the competitive slaughter of cassowaries and pigs in rawa.