cassowary


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cassowary

(kăs`əwâr'ē), common name for a flightless, swift-running, pugnacious forest bird of Australia and the Malay Archipelago, smaller than the ostrichostrich,
common name for a large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) of Africa and parts of SW Asia, allied to the rhea, the emu and the extinct moa. It is the largest of living birds; some males reach a height of 8 ft (244 cm) and weigh from 200 to 300 lb (90–135
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 and emuemu
or emeu
, common name for a large, flightless bird of Australia, related to the cassowary and the ostrich. There is only one living species, Dromaius novaehollandiae. It is 5 to 6 ft (150–180 cm) tall and a very swift runner.
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. The plumage is dark and glossy and the head and neck unfeathered, wattled, and brilliantly colored, with variations in the coloring in different species. The head bears a horny crest. The female is larger than the male, though both sexes are similar in color. They are monogamous and nest in shallow nests of leaves on the ground in forests. Only the male incubates the female's three to six dark-green eggs. Cassowaries are primarily nocturnal. Their diet consists mainly of fruits and berries, although some eat insects and small animals. Cassowaries are notoriously vicious and have attacked and killed men with their sharp, spikelike toenails. They are fast runners, attaining speeds up to 30 mi (48 km) per hr. Cassowaries are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Struthioniformes, family Casuariidae.

cassowary

[′kas·ə‚wer·ē]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of three species of large, heavy, flightless birds composing the family Casuariidae in the order Casuariiformes.

cassowary

any large flightless bird of the genus Casuarius, inhabiting forests in NE Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands, having a horny head crest, black plumage, and brightly coloured neck and wattles: order Casuariiformes (see ratite)
References in periodicals archive ?
ETYMOLOGY: This species is named for the crest on the head that is reminiscent of the spectacular ratite of tropical Queensland and Papua New Guinea, the cassowary.
Thirty-five per cent of cassowary populations were killed directly during Cyclone Larry, but those that survived and ventured beyond the fragments suffered even higher mortality--struck by cars or attacked by dogs.
Cassowary `politics' inevitably came to the fore, on many occasions threatening to terminate the project" (p.
Agnates' greed in failing to share cassowary meat is often cited as the reason why individuals leave to take up residence elsewhere.
The New Guinea people are said to live chiefly on pigs and sago; from them are obtained the cassowary feathers used in their dances, and stone-headed clubs.
Yet this sinewy fellow had a free hand and a long cassowary bone dagger.
The new cats join the Jungle's already diverse animal family which includes some of the world's most incredible animals including a set of orangutan twins, a liger and a cassowary.
Cassowary Coast Regional Council Mayor John Kremastos praised the hard work and dedication of the emergency service workers and council staff who worked tirelessly to inform and assist residents over the weekend.
The cassowary is a bird found in Australia, New Guinea, and Indonesia.
The mysterious island of Papua is home to one of the largest and most dangerous birds on the planet, the Southern cassowary.
The first phase, open from July 13, will put a spotlight on highly threatened, yet often unheralded species, such as the critically endangered Visayan warty pig, lowland anoa and the prehistoric-looking cassowary.
And the lack of local leadership and understanding of just how special the cassowary habitat at Mission Beach is, means there is not enough pressure on state and federal governments to make change.