castration anxiety


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Related to castration anxiety: castration complex, Electra complex

castration anxiety

[ka′strā·shən aŋ′zī·ə·dē]
(psychology)
Anxiety due to the fear of loss of the genitals or injury to them.
References in periodicals archive ?
I could never quite believe that Sigmund F's assertion that all men suffered from castration anxiety could be taken seriously by so many writers.
In his theory of castration anxiety, according to Boyarin, Freud exhibits the "doubled consciousness" of the colonized, that is, the simultaneous self-contempt in the gaze of, and desire for, the dominant culture.
Another behavior associated with castration anxiety is homosexuality (Goldenson 1: 187), references to which abound in the story.
(2.) I want to be fair and acknowledge Eby's one-sentence disclaimer that "while analysts no longer look for the origins of fetishism in castration anxiety "an unusually sharp castration complex is [still] generally agreed to be the central organizing nucleus in the structure of fetishism" (55, Eby's italics, quoting Roiphe and Galenson).
"We can hardly speak with propriety of castration anxiety where castration has already taken place" (1926, 123).
Finally, one might feminize the very structure of the fetishizing process, which traditionally assumes castration anxiety and female inferiority.
Among some of the major concepts discussed in this paper were: castration anxiety, fear of loss of love, the death instinct, and the role of the defense mechanisms (especially denial).
It's a collective case of castration anxiety.") Last spring, Wolcott wrote an intelligent, though typically abrasive, essay in Vanity Fair in which he criticized contemporary humor writing and gave Spy jokes a mixed review.
Many are toys, suggesting what Freud called male infantile curiosity about the female body, and, with that, castration anxiety. Are the objects prosthetic male genitalia?
Creed's insistence on "castration anxiety as the central concern of horror film" (64) has in the past prompted my students to threaten to inflict "gaping wounds" on all Freudian theorists, but she does touch on the centrality of the bodily affect inherent in the genre.
The bulk of Davison's textual analysis commences more than midway through her study, with a chapter focusing largely on the varying functions of the Wandering Jew in The Monk (as millenarian), William Godwin's St Leon (as a warning of the evils of modern 'Jewish' economics) and Charles Robert Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer (as signifying castration anxiety).
Further, she deconstructs this look positing it between a reinforcement of the patriarchal, symbolic order and a fetishization of the female actor in response to castration anxiety. While founding principles of film analysis, Mulvey's theories did not necessarily seek to take into account the historical details of a given film's production.