casuistry

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casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
Compare Charles Fried's casual treatment of a classic nonlegal dilemma, that "[o]ne who provides an expensive education for his own children surely cannot be blamed because he does not use these resources to alleviate famine or to save lives in some distant land," (122) with the full casuistical analysis of the same problem conducted by ethicist Garth Hallett in his book Priorities and Christian Ethics.
But, as he says, there are parallels; indeed, he speaks of "[t]he place of casuistical analysis in Tudor legal discourse" as being "well established".
Initially, there were no satisfactory mechanisms for linking statements of principle, such as the AFL's often stated opposition to racism in any form, on or off the field, to casuistical capacity.
Correspondingly, the "thin" and formalistic universal law formulation of Kant's categorical imperative is tied necessarily to the "thick" and substantive end-in-itself formulation, now reconceived as the basic a priori moral principle for a quasi-deductive casuistical (in the good sense) system of moral judgments.
His critics have pointed out that Cardozo's decisions could be oversubtle, even casuistical.
In its casuistical critique of positive institution, Caleb Williams divides the philosophical from the political, aligning both its sympathies and its ethics squarely with the former term.
While Fifine with its speaker's casuistical defense of adultery is often considered on a par with Sordello's obscurity, Red Cotton Night-Cap Country with its protagonist's conflict between carnal sin and religious fervor received critical praise for its relative lucidity.
To understand why, we need to consider the casuistical trait of early modern problem solving.
I thought I could defend my conversation, but it would have been complicated, circuitous, casuistical.
60) I describe this kind of analysis in more detail in David Thacher, The Casuistical Turn in Planning Ethics: Lessons from Law and Medicine, 23 J.