casuistry


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casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
This fine addition to Studies in the History of Christian Thought, a series edited by Heiko Oberman, focuses on John Donne (1573-1631), the English poet and Anglican preacher, and his use of casuistry in the "post-Reformation debate about authority and interpretation" (p.
Donne certainly read these authors, but Brown espouses sixteenth-century suspicions about devious Catholics by seeing Navarrus's Enchiridion as typical of Catholic casuistry, and not, say, the homely manuals of Persons and Allen.
Second is the crude slippage from Armenian sympathizers to Armenian "terrorists"--standard Administration casuistry in all cases but unusually crass in this one.
They cover biography, theology, and race; contingency, virtue, and holiness; temperament, habit, and the ethics guild; ecclesial politics, peacemaking, and the eschatology of worship; whether casuistry, natural law, and virtue are methods; just war, pacifism, and gender; medical ethics, disability, and the cross; and preaching, praying, and primary Christian language.
The authors shed new light, even while treating disparate subjects, on well-worn topics: religious freedom (Francis Sullivan on tradition); sexual ethics (Lisa Cahill on moral theology and Cathleen Kaveny on the uses of casuistry); and clerical and lay practice (Leslie Tentler on the abandonment of confession, Dean Hoge et al.
Reason of state, then, whenever there was an attempt to justify it, came from and was a part of the casuistry of practical ethics, and it expressed all the ambivalence commonly associated with casuistic reasoning.
Conscience on stage; the Comedia as casuistry in early modern Spain.
This part of the study, while still not providing much further evidence for the fantasy of male pregnancy, is nevertheless rock-solid in its analysis of early modern casuistry with regard to sexual morality.
This is a fine example of casuistry, which (in case you do not have your Chamber's Dictionary to hand) is a "plausibly deceptive fallacy".
They show how contemporary moral theologians, using a refined casuistry, applying the principles of toleration, cooperation and double effect, can and do make a credible case for using condoms and needle exchange programs as steps toward the prevention of the spread of the HIV virus.
Gods Determinations is analysed in an essay by the editor, who construes them through 'Puritan Casuistry', and another by J.