casuistry


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casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
These arguments are specifically couched in terms of probabilism, a branch of casuistry.
According to Anscombe, Christian ethics and virtue ethics have yet another common feature: casuistry as a decision procedure.
Casuistry was training in how to engage with and navigate through complex cases involving the internal conscience of a Catholic with the external demands of the state, in order to find safety in Protestant England.
Nor does he mention casuistry, a method by which medical ethicists have often made judgments; casuistry also has religious roots in Judaism, Islam, and Christianity.
Sebelius has stopped denying that fact, but even yesterday addressed it with a mix of casuistry and half-truths.
Yet to argue that Salle was focused on an art of existential effect (as if following a thread leading from Suprematism through Abstract Expressionism) smacks terribly of casuistry, since, from the outset of his notable career, the ocean of ciphers in which he has luxuriated have begged to be decoded.
Available as a download from an array of websites, Inspire represents a shift among Western jihadists from following theological casuistry on YouTube videos and chat rooms to mobilizing individuals for violent jihad in their home countries.
Such use of euphemism leads to casuistry and, ultimately, the losing of an argument.
It was a typical casuistry of accommodation, the same one used on nuclear deterrence.
Moralism, an inordinate, legalistic dependence upon absolute moral codes out of fear of divine judgment, leads to elaborate, complicated casuistry.
As Maryks further acknowledges, it is his purpose in this book tenaciously to highlight "the crucial links between early-modern casuistry and ancient rhetoric (especially Ciceronian)" and to underline the fact that the Jesuits came to base "their rhetoric and casuistry on the Ciceronian .
Ali bin Fadhl bin Ghanem Al Buainain, Chairman of the Sunni Supreme Sharia Court Shaikh Adnan bin Abdullah Al Qattan, Deputy Sheit Supreme Court Shaikh Nasser Ahmed Khalaf Al Asfoor, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Shaikh Mohammed bin Ali Bin Mohammed Al Khalifa, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Isa bin Mubarak Al Ka'abi, Chairman of Legislation and legal casuistry Committee Abdulla bin Hassan Al Buainain, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Saed Hassan Jassim Al Hayki and Lawyer Hameed Habeeb Ahmed.