catalepsy

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catalepsy

(kăt`əlĕp'sē), pathological condition characterized by a loss of consciousness accompanied by rigidity of muscles that keeps limbs in any position in which they are placed. Attacks vary from several minutes to days and occur in a variety of clinical syndromes, most frequently in schizophrenia, epilepsy, and hysteria.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Catalepsy

 

the phenomenon of “waxy rigidity,” observed incatatonia or hypnotic sleep (hypnosis). With an increase in mus-cle tonus, there is an onset of rigidity (flexible rigidity), so thateither the entire body or the extremities remain in any positionin which they are placed.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

catalepsy

[′kad·əl‚ep·sē]
(psychology)
Suspended animation with loss of voluntary motion associated with hysteria and the schizophrenic reactions in humans, and with organic nervous system disease in animals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

catalepsy

a state of prolonged rigid posture, occurring for example in schizophrenia or in hypnotic trances
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Our study shows that 4-phenyl 1,5-benzodiazepin-2-one and its derivatives do not have catatonigenic (cataleptic) effects on the central nervous system at therapeutic doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg.
AZE 100 and 300 mg/kg inhibited the cataleptic effect of haloperidol (1 mg/kg) throughout the 60 min after haloperidol treatment.
Recently, new pharmacological agents, acting on the serotoninergic and/or noradrenergic systems, allow a better control of the cataleptic attacks (6, 7).
Methought I was immersed in a cataleptic trance of more than usual duration and profundity.
Between them, Lyons and Camp trace the move from the aesthetics of classical tragedy to those of the bourgeois drama, while Vila considers the theatricality inherent to the clinical observation and aesthetic representation of cataleptics. Galvez and Hogg address the different modes of perception and attendant emotions induced by the crystal and the portrait.
In the present study, haloperidol induced a strong cataleptic effect during at the four-hour period of the study.
Being vice president is comparable to "a man in a cataleptic fit; he cannot speak; he cannot move; he suffers no pain; he is perfectly conscious of all that goes on but has no part in it."
Proust "held himself suspended over life in a cataleptic trance, [...] corroded by the very skepticism he had employed." (50) Accepting as we are of Proust's myopic "retreat from life," (51) it is significant to consider the nature of Miller's confrontation of it.
Recognizing that such moments of recognition are the result of both "discovery" and "creation," Nussbaum asserts in a discussion of Proust that the "blinding moment of cataleptic knowledge, like any other break in the walls of habit, has the feeling of eternity, of the whole of life!
These are silleptic innovation shoots or cataleptic innovation shoots, respectively (Rua, 1999; Vegetti, 2003).
Reports of Haitians buried in a cataleptic states and later revived for enslavement--for example, the 1980 case of Clairvius Narcisse--have been credible enough to prompt several scientific investigations.
Having long expected his sister's demise, Usher is now apparently too grief-stricken to notice her apparently cataleptic condition and has presumably been assured of his sister's death by the family physician, who had earlier shown what the narrator imagines to be "low cunning and perplexity" (320) on the day of his arrival.