cathodic inhibitor

cathodic inhibitor

[kə′thäd·ik in′hib·əd·ər]
(chemical engineering)
A compound, such as calcium bicarbonate or sodium phosphate, which is deposited on a metal surface in a thin film that operates at the cathodes to provide physical protection over the entire surface against corrosive attack in a conducting medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
In all three cases, a decrease in the corrosion current density is observed; however, a displacement of the corrosion potential towards more active potentials characterizes a cathodic inhibitor and in the opposite case to an anodic type.
Hence, the second assumption was made that Lawsonia inermis act as cathodic inhibitor.
The steel rebar has difference in [E.sub.corr] more than [+ or -] 85 mV versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) when it is exposed in inhibitor; such type of inhibitor works as anodic or cathodic inhibitor [55-58].
Cathodic inhibitors tend to be metal salts (of Ca, Zn, Mg, and Ni) that interact with the hydroxyls produced at cathodes and deposit insoluble hydroxides at those sites.
Cathodic inhibitors, such as inorganic salts of magnesium and manganese, suppress corrosion at the cathode by forming insoluble deposits with hydroxyl ions in neutral environments.