Catostomidae

(redirected from catostomid)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Catostomidae

[‚kad·ə′stäm·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The suckers, a family of cypriniform fishes in the suborder Cyprinoidei.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Similar to many imperiled catostomids that have suffered from degradation and loss of riverine habitat (Yoder and Beaumier, 1986; Cooke et al.
Catostomids comprised the majority (80%) of the larval fish drifting in Honey Creek.
1998), and near the basal roots of several major teleostean clades, such as salmonids (Allendorf & Thorgaard 1984), catostomids (Ferris 1984; Uyeno & Smith 1972), acipenserids (Vasil'ev 1999) and some cyprinids (Larhammer & Risinger 1994).
Systematic studies of the catostomid fish tribe Moxostomatini.
Demographics of the spawning aggregations of four catostomid species in the Savannah River, South Carolina and Georgia.
Some catostomid species have been used as a food source for humans and have important cultural value (Moyle, 2002).
common carp Cyprinus carpio and catostomids in large rivers; Matheney and Rabeni, 1995; Crook, 2004; Grabowski and Isely, 2006; Jeffres et al.
Catostomids inhabit a wide range of lotic and lentic freshwater ecosystems with the greatest diversity found in the Mississippi drainage and southeastern United States (Berra, 2007).
Increasing hybridization of these two native catostomids with introduced catostomids in the Colorado River Basin also threatens their continued existence (McAda, 1977; Cook et al.
Numerous catostomid species have similarly experienced range contractions and population declines (Cooke et al.
The catostomid genus Cycleptus has been recently recognized as polytypic, with allopatric groups in the Mississippi system, the Gulf Slope drainages (Mobile Basin to Pearl River, Louisiana) and the Rio Grande (Burr and Mayden, 199).
Taxonomic analyses of these fish, including the examination of specimen number 18,008 from Provo, Utah which Smith (1966:53) assigned to Catostomus plebeius, are phylogenetically important because they may reveal an unnamed catostomid or a disjunct population of a known catostomid which is widely separated from its conspecifics; also, they are significant because they may demonstrate that there are sympatric Pantost eus suckers in Utah Valley and Salt Lake Valley.