cauda equina


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Related to cauda equina: Cauda equina syndrome

cauda equina

[′kau̇d·ə i′kwīn·ə]
(neuroscience)
The roots of the sacral and coccygeal nerves, collectively; so called because of their resemblance to a horse's tail.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the literature, there is only one reported case of cauda equina syndrome following an epidural lysis that recovered without any sequelae (4).
Al elevar la pierna, la cauda equina se desplaza anterior y caudalmente y causa un cese temporal del flujo sanguineo.
70% of the cases reach to full functional capacity within 4-6 weeks thanks to the conservative treatment, the treatment for those with progressive neurologic deficit and cauda equina syndrome who resist to conservative treatment and whose diagnosis is also proved radiologically is surgery [8, 27].
From the neurological standpoint there may be transient motor weakness, cauda equina syndrome (very few cases reported) with symptoms usually resolving within hours or days; there may also be direct neurological damage.
At the final follow-up the one with radicular deficit and the two with incomplete cauda equina syndrome recovered completely and all the patients were symptom-free.
renal colic, spinal-cord injury, acute cauda equina syndrome) that result in acute LBP.
24,25] At surgery lesion tend to arise from filum or cauda equina and are well encapsulated.
The grandmother-of-one, from Southport, now hopes to raise awareness of Cauda Equina Syndrome, which she says is all too often left undiagnosed.
5%) patients had radicular symptoms followed by Cauda Equina syndrome in three (27.
Os exemplares de sauim apresentaram sete vertebras lombares e tres vertebras sacrais (Figura IA), sendo que, em todos os exemplares, a base do cone medular, disposta caudalmente a intumescencia lombar, localizou-se ao nivel da 4a vertebra lombar (L4), enquanto que e o apice ao nivel da 2a vertebra sacral (S2), sendo seguido pela cauda equina (Figura IB).
spinal cord injury (suprasacral), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, cauda equina syndrome and Fowler's syndrome (Table 2).