caudillismo


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Related to caudillismo: Juan Manuel de Rosas

caudillismo

a system of rule by one man using violence or the threat of violence for political ends (a Spanish word used in the 19th-century to refer to regional or national military rulers who emerged in Latin America after independence from Spain). The term is now more generally used to refer to localized, powerful individuals who may call upon followers, either within or outside a state system, to use violence or the threat of violence to coerce others. In Mexico cacique means the same, or is the preferred term, when applied to local, rather than regional or national, power brokers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caudillismo persists in Argentina, Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua,
Y que impida que demandas historicas como la soberania alimentaria, el acceso a la tierra y al agua o la verdadera participacion sean anuladas por el pragmatismo politico, el desarrollismo economico y el caudillismo autoritario.
Y este pseudoperiodismo, que aspira desde luego a dirigir la sociedad, es facilmente reconocible, advierte Ortega, por la utilizacion masiva de dos recursos principales: la charlataneria (siempre buscando el descredito generalizado de la politica) y la opinion infundada (radicalismo, moralismo, oportunismo, hasta caudillismo).
In Coronado's view, the FNRP has developed, mainly last year, its own institutional setup, avoiding the phenomenon of caudillismo [authoritarian leadership], a historic trademark of Latin American politics.
La Vanguardia complemented the statement from The Economist with the words of well-known Colombian journalist and former director of the daily El Tiempo, Enrique Santos Calderon: "In considering himself indispensible and irreplaceable, Uribe reveals an egotism that can turn into a hard-to-swallow and harmful caudillismo."