cauline


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cauline

[′kȯ‚līn]
(botany)
Belonging to or arising from the stem, particularly if on the upper portion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most basal cauline leaf in the proximal third of the stem, 25-54 x 0.
The width of the axis is consistent with measurements of cauline specimens reported by Zodrow (2002).
They are cauline in origin and cauline in their ultimate position.
aletes by Hitchcock) as distinct species separated primarily by the degree of development of auricles on the cauline leaves, length of nectar glands at the base of the fruit, and trichome density on upper parts of the stem.
Cauline vasculature and leaf trace production in medullosan pteridosperms.
5 cm, cordate to subtruncate at base; lobes broadly ovate, entire, obtuse to subacute at apex; cauline leaves absent or 1, petiolate, much smaller than basal leaves.
These include cauline rather than basal leaves and a series of repeated axillary synflorescences rather than a terminal inflorescence.
Ligule of distal-most cauline leaf, length (mm): [less than or equal to]2.
is characterized by having yellow flowers, strongly 2-lobed stigmas, often pinnately divided but never auriculate or amplexicaul cauline leaves, and simple or no trichomes.
Further reduction would lead to fusion of the sporangium with the shoot axis, thus becoming cauline in position, as is considered by Zimmermann to be true of some living species of Lycopodium.
Both have woody caudex, non-rosulate, fleshy basal leaves, dentate cauline leaves, few- to several-flowered racemes, thick fruiting pedicels, frequently pubescent filament bases, confluent nectar glands, similar number of ovules per ovary, thick fruit valves, relatively large seeds (to 2.
1970; Jarzen, 1980), cauline growth without stolons, and axillary spikes