cauline


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cauline

[′kȯ‚līn]
(botany)
Belonging to or arising from the stem, particularly if on the upper portion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most basal cauline leaf in the proximal third of the stem, 25-54 x 0.3-1 cm, at the base sheathing the base of the stem; the upper leaves gradually smaller, the most distal bracteiform, ovate-lanceolate, 1.5-3.5 x 0.5-1 cm, at the base sheathing the basal part of the peduncles.
The width of the axis is consistent with measurements of cauline specimens reported by Zodrow (2002).
They are cauline in origin and cauline in their ultimate position.
Typically, each stem produces a single large terminal flower, but diminutive second or third flowers sometimes occur in axils of the cauline leaves.
The red radiation generally promotes shoot elongation, as it is absorbed by phytochromes that are responsible for positive photoblastic seed germination, cauline growth and photoperiodic control of flowering (MAJEROWICZ & PERES, 2008).
In this phase, leaf shape changes into the cauline form, internodes stretch, and the shoot apical meristem converts into an inflorescence meristem giving rise to inflorescences instead of leaves.
Cauline vasculature and leaf trace production in medullosan pteridosperms.
Leaves basal, petiole 3-10 cm long; leaf blade suborbicular to reniform in outline, palmately 5(-7)-lobed, sometimes with additional pair of smaller lobes, 1-3 x 1-2.5 cm, cordate to subtruncate at base; lobes broadly ovate, entire, obtuse to subacute at apex; cauline leaves absent or 1, petiolate, much smaller than basal leaves.
These include cauline rather than basal leaves and a series of repeated axillary synflorescences rather than a terminal inflorescence.
Ligule of distal-most cauline leaf, length (mm): [less than or equal to]2.2 (0), [greater than or equal to]2.3 (1) Infructescences 2.