Cauterization

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Related to Cauter: Couter, cautery, cauterizing

cauterization

[‚kȯd·ə·rə′zā·shən]
(medicine)
Use of a device or chemical agent to coagulate or destroy tissue.

Cauterization

 

a medical treatment utilizing thermal, chemical, electric, or radiation burns. Cauterization is used to destroy such conditions as small skin tumors, warts, excessive granulations, and tattoos. It can be performed by diathermal coagulation, galvanocautery, chemical substances, or laser radiation. In surgical practice it is used to separate tissue and to stop bleeding (electric scalpel, laser beam). In the treatment of some inflammatory diseases, cauterizing agents in the form of a mustard plaster or ultraviolet radiation (quartz) serve a revulsive and reflex-therapeutic function.

V. B. GEL’FAND

References in periodicals archive ?
Van Cauter, "Impact of sleep debt on metabolic and endocrine function," Lancet, vol.
[10.] Spiegel K, Knutson K, Leproult R, Tasali E, Cauter EV.
Evidence has shown that shiftwork, particularly the combination of day and night shifts, contributes to nurses' fatigue (Admi, Tzischinsky, Epstein, Herer, & Lavie, 2008; Akerstedt & Wright, 2009; Berger & Hobbs, 2006; Hartenbaum, Van Cauter, & Zee, 2011; Kilpatrick & Lavoie-Tremblay, 2006; Muecke, 2005).
Contrastingly, the literature shows that subjects classified as physically active coupled to good heart conditions are associated with low risk factor levels for hypertension (RANKINEN et al., 2007; CHASE et al., 2009; KRUEGER; FRIEDMAN, 2009; KNUTSON; CAUTER, 2008; VIEGAS; OLIVEIRA, 2006).
(10) Jacques Derrida and Lieven De Cauter, "For a Justice to Come: An Interview with Jacques Derrida," in Lasse Thomassen, ed., The Derrida-Habermas Reader (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), p.
Finally, Lieven De Cauter expresses his doubts about the messianic radicalism shared by both Benjamin and Agamben, to which he prefers Derrida's cautious reference to a "weak messianicity."
"Some people claim they can tolerate the cognitive effects of routine sleep deprivation," said co-author Eve Van Cauter, PhD, the Frederick H.
Poor HL is an area of concern as it impacts an individual's ability to cope with his/her CHCND (Aronsohn, Whitmore, Van Cauter, & Tasali, 2009; Giannotti, Cortesi, Cerquiglini, Miraglia, Vagnoni, & Sebastiani, et al., 2008; Newman, O'Regan, & Hensey, 2006).
"[N]ew to politics," they find that "the form of representation itself is not adequate to their desires" (De Cauter).