caveat

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caveat

Law a formal notice requesting the court or officer to refrain from taking some specified action without giving prior notice to the person lodging the caveat
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the investors have moved to court seeking orders to force the two government watchdogs to lift the caveats placed on their properties to pave the way for their development or disposal.For instance, a private investor has sued the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) for failure to complete investigations into the ownership of a multimillion shilling property in Nyeri town.
Caveats were not used because that would have been counterproductive to silence Eurosceptics, who in their deeprooted political ignorance, would have called foul and been even more disruptive.
Tata Sons and a Tata Trust, among others, filed the caveats that they should be heard before grant of any interim stay order to the ousted Chairman.
First, judge advocates must understand the shifting nature of caveats, both declared and undeclared, and the impacts these have on mission planning and execution.
The chief of the people's national committee in Yitta Township, Ratib Jibbour, told the Palestinian News Agency (WAFA) that the so-called "civil administration" escorted by Israeli-occupation army delivered a number of caveats to Palestinian families living in Zanouta Village threatening the demolition of 27 homes which accommodate tens of families.
During his brief visit to Pakistan, Kerry was asked to clarify the wording with regard to caveats associated with spending the KLB money on Pakistan's nuclear programme.
The word that best describes this problem is "caveats," the limitations that individual NATO nations place on the use of their forces, even when actually deployed in Afghanistan.
All the usual caveats about reloading apply, of course.
The task force recommended that appropriate caveats be developed to advise readers that the advice is not a TAM, that it is based on facts provided solely by IRS personnel, and that the legal conclusion might differ if the facts are not as presented."
Schoen keenly weaves these stories with historical caveats highlighting the societal and political forces which shaped each decade from the 1850's to the present.
Two attorneys from Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel offer a useful list of pointers and caveats for companies to keep in mind when they sign business process outsourcing (BPO) contracts.
Gose's "Caveats for Teaching the Novel," selected for the "Editor's Choice," addresses many of these same concerns about working with longer pieces of literature and with students majoring in fields other than English.