cavernous


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

cavernous

[′kav·ər·nəs]
(geology)
Having many caverns or cavities.
Producing caverns.
Of or pertaining to a cavern, that is, suggesting vastness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Immunohistochemically, the cells lining the cavernous space and vacuolated epithelioid cells are positive for vimentin, CD31, CD34, and factor-VIII-related antigen, supporting the endothelial nature [1-3, 5, 7-9, 11, 12, 15].
Following initiation of heparin infusion, a CT venogram (CTV) confirmed the presence of thrombosis along with a filling defect in the L cavernous sinus (Figure 3).
Various mass lesions in the brainstem, such as primary and metastatic tumors, and cavernous malformations (Figure 3B), may involve the nuclei and/or the fascicular fibers of CN V (2, 15).
A follow-up MRI in patient 5 after three months showed decreased signal intensity and enhancement of the affected cavernous sinus.
Small cavernous malformations may represent as focal area of decreased signal density, "black dots".
Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), also known as cavernous angioma, is a type of vascular malformation in the central nervous system.
It is usually painful and rigid erection, characterised by little or no cavernous blood flow resulting in abnormal (dark red) cavernous blood gases (hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis) (3).
Computed tomography (CT) and CT angiogram revealed a destructive skull base mass with an associated giant probable pseudoaneurysm of the cavernous segment of the left internal carotid artery.
The lesion was resected and the diagnosis of cavernous type hemangioma was confirmed by pathology studies.
(7) Of the remaining cases, 26 (11%) displayed acute ischemic necrosis and 69 (30%) were diagnosed as cavernous degeneration, a morphologic variant of ION (see below).
Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs) develop as a shunt between the cavernous sinus and carotid arterial system [1].
The histopathological examination revealed an intramuscular cavernous hemangioma (Figure 4).