cavernous sinus

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cavernous sinus

[′kav·ər·nəs ′sī·nəs]
(anatomy)
Either of a pair of venous sinuses of the dura mater located on the side of the body of the sphenoid bone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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of Patients Squamous cell carcinoma 1 Bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis 1 due aspergillosis Table 4 X-Ray Skull Abnormal Normal Total Bilateral Multiple 1 2 3 Cranial Nerve Palsies 1 39 40 2.5% 97.5% 100.0% Table 5 Duration of DM Diabetic 3rd Nerve Palsy Complete Partial 0-5 years 0 0 6-13 years 3 1 14-20 years 4 0 Total 7 1 Figure 1 FEMALE 21 MALE 19 Note: Table made from pie chart.
of Percentage Disorder Patients (%) Injuries Direct Trauma 8 21.62 Foreign Bodies 5 13.51 Inflammatory (Non-Specific) Pseudotumours 3 8.10 Thyroid Exophthalmos 1 2.70 Neoplastic Benign 6 16.21 Malignant 11 29.72 Lesion Affecting Orbital Structure Epidermoid of frontal bone 2 5.40 Cavernous sinus thrombosis 1 2.70 Table 4: Foreign Body Detection by CT (n=5) Commonest foreign material was iron.
Table 1 Classifications of Orbital Infection and Inflammation [1][3][5] Group Chandler Maloney First Inflammatory oedema Preseptal cellulitis Second Orbital Cellulitis Subperiosteal abscess Third Subperiosteal abscess Orbital cellulitis Fourth Orbital Abscess Orbital Abscess Fifth Cavernous sinus thrombosis Cavernous sinus thrombosis Table 2: Aetiology in cases with infectious causes Disease No.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate soft tissue lesions better, especially in diagnosis of cavernous sinus thrombosis.
Examples of otitis media complications include mastoiditis, meningitis, periauricular subperiosteal abscess, epidural or subdural abscess, brain abscess, lateral sinus thrombophlebitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and facial paralysis.
Untreated chronic sinusitis can result in severe complications such as orbital cellulitis, osteomyelitis, subdural empyema, frontal lobe abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis and death (2).
Among this group, 2 patients had meningitis, 1 was treated for an epidural abscess and cavernous sinus thrombosis, and 1 underwent drainage of a subdural empyema.
Of the 53 mastoidectomies, 29 (54.7%) had been performed on patients with a clinical subperiosteal abscess in the mastoid region, 14 (26.4%) on patients who had not responded to conservative treatment, 3 (5.7%) on patients with meningitis, 3 on patients with facial nerve paralysis, 1 (1.9%) on a patient with perisinus abscess, 1 on a patient with subdural empyema, 1 on a patient with an epidural abscess and cavernous sinus thrombosis, and 1 on a patient with suspected sigmoid sinus thrombosis.
(8) Progression can lead to orbital cellulitis, orbital apex syndrome, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and eventually fatal involvement of the central nervous system.
(11) Their system classifies orbital infections into five stages: periorbital cellulitis (stage I), orbital cellulitis (stage II), subperiosteal abscess (stage III), orbital abscess (stage IV), and cavernous sinus thrombosis (stage V).
Chandler et al defined the five stages of orbital complications of sinusitis as inflammatory edema, orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess, and cavernous sinus thrombosis. [4]
Neurologic sequelae can include meningitis, brain abscess, and cavernous sinus thrombosis. [17]