cavitation damage

cavitation damage

[‚kav·ə′tā·shən ‚dam·ij]
(metallurgy)

cavitation damage

The pitting of concrete caused by implosion (collapse) of bubbles in flowing water.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Invitation to tender: rehabilitation of cavitation damage
1] stated that the zone near the inception point of air entrainment will be critical in terms of the risk of cavitation damage.
Semicrystalline polymers are known to exhibit cavitation damage when stretched above their glass transition temperature [1, 2], Such a phenomenon has been largely reported until recently for instance in polyethylene (PE) [3-5], polyoxymethylene (POM) [6, 7], polyamide 11 (PA 11) [8], polypropylene (PP) [9, 10] or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) [11-13],
The cavitation damage is caused when a bubble collapses in the vicinity of a solid surface.
The report also said the HP fuel pumps from both engines of the Boeing 777 had "unusual and fresh cavitation damage to the outlet ports consistent with operation at low inlet pressure".
Cavitation - cavitation damage associated with lubricant flows in dynamically loaded journal bearings, industrial stretching flows such as fibre spinning and the potential formation of cavitation bubbles.
The first technical director of the Ductile Iron Society, he worked for the British Ministry of Munitions and the International Nickel Co He is recognized for his promotion of the development of NiBral for ship propellors, which reduced cavitation damage on the U.
For any engine that is experiencing cavitation damage, the easiest and most direct way to eliminate cavitation is to raise the head pressure on the coolant until [P.
This counters the conventional explanation of how bubbles cause pitting, or cavitation damage, in turbine blades, pumps, propellers and other materials in contact with moving fluids.
Today's hydroelectric utilities are faced with maintenance and repair needs such as turbine cavitation damage caused by the passage of water and the need to improve turbine efficiency," said Jean-Francois Dupont, operations manager of Invensys' Vision and Robotics group.
Now a group led by Notre Dame professors Patrick Dunn and Flint Thomas has published the first detailed results of experiments aimed at preventing cavitation damage in jet fuel pumps, which are essential components in modern aircraft.
The smallest values of the cavitation damage is about 97[micro]m, at steel 10/6, with the smallest value of equivalent in chromium, about 10.