celestial longitude


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celestial longitude

(ecliptic longitude) See ecliptic coordinate system.

celestial longitude

[sə′les·chəl ′län·jə‚tüd]
(astronomy)
Angular distance east of the vernal equinox, along the ecliptic; the arc of the ecliptic or the angle at the ecliptic pole between the circle of latitude of the vernal equinox and the circle of latitude of a point on the celestial sphere, measured eastward from the circle of latitude of the vernal equinox, through 360°. Also known as ecliptic longitude.

celestial longitude

The celestial longitude of a body is the arc of the ecliptic contained between the first point of Aries and the secondary ecliptic through that body measured eastward from Aries. It is the angular distance along the ecliptic from the vernal equinox eastward. See celestial latitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
These dates of opposition are those of the opposition in celestial longitude, not in right ascension.
I took 30 [degrees] of celestial longitude as the maximum extent of a "grouping," included the Sun and the Moon, but omitted the faint planets Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto.
Its progress along the ecliptic, the green arc that passes close to the southern horizon in our all-sky map on pages 58 and 59, is measured as celestial longitude.
Finally the program gives the Moon's approximate celestial longitude, which ranges from 0 |degrees~ to 360 |degrees~.