celestial navigation


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celestial navigation

[sə′les·chəl nav·ə′gā·shən]
(navigation)

celestial navigation

A form of navigation where the known position of celestial bodies and their angle to the observer, along with the time of the observation, are used to determine position. The exact position of stars is given in a nautical or aeronautical almanac. This form of navigation has been almost entirely replaced by various forms of electronic navigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another form of navigation, also used by navigators today, is celestial navigation. Explorers knew that there was a pattern to the movements of the stars and planets in the sky.
Grace Farrell offers a psychological reading of Celestial Navigation as a tale about what Freud identified as the "impossible mourning" created by the childhood separation of the self from its mother.
Technology breakthroughs, from computer miniaturization to celestial navigation, were made on a regular basis.
Her Celestial Navigation (1974) tells of an artist's attempt to fight off the comfortable isolation of his room and his art and make contact with others.
With oncoming darkness, naturalists will discuss celestial navigation and use floodlights on the water to view nocturnal feeders.
In place of stars, Martinez has substituted the logos of international corporations and entities that use the astral bodies as their symbol--here, celestial navigation is commandeered by the logic of global capital.
Brother Magnus was renowned for his skills in celestial navigation, albeit self-taught.
In addition, he also wrote a few independent works, whose subjects included cosmology, ephemerides (the study that focuses on celestial navigation by providing the positions of naturally occurring astronomical objects in the sky at any given time), astrolabes, as well as a treatise on the distances and sizes of the planets, and another work on the creation of almanacs.
We had been trained in celestial navigation - plotting our courses by star fixes - and we also were familiar with dead reckoning, in which we tried to estimate our position by watching the ground below, but what do you do when you're in the soup and can see nothing either up or down?
Draw more information from celestial bodies right before your eyes with Captain Steve Miller's primer on celestial navigation. Visit the unseen world of radio astronomy and the future of superscopes with Ivan Semeniuk.
But, since the celestial sphere is moving westward at 15[degrees] per hour, the big trick in celestial navigation is knowing your time.
Soldiers need to know how to read maps accurately, how to navigate, and how to understand all manner of maps, compasses, celestial navigation and more.