cell recognition

cell recognition

[′sel ‚rek·əg‚nish·ən]
(cell and molecular biology)
The mutual recognition of cells, as expressed by specific cellular adhesion, due to a specific complementary interaction between molecules on adjacent cell surfaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
GTB-1550 targets cancer cells expressing the CD19 receptor or CD22 receptor or both receptors thereby maximizing cancer cell recognition by binding to CD19+, CD22+ and CD19+/CD22+ cancer cells.
These data confirm that genotoxic drugs such as cisplatin do not render NB cell lines more susceptible to NK cell recognition.
In order to avoid false positives due to aspecific binding event between biochip surface and other circulating cells, we proposed a cell recognition assay through the use of synthetic fluorescently labeled peptides that specifically bind UTR on cell membrane.
Casado et al., "NK cell recognition and killing of melanoma cells is controlled by multiple activating receptor-ligand interactions," Journal of Innate Immunity, vol.
Adhesion molecules have a role in the regulation of conditions including cell recognition, specific cell migration, embryogenesis, cell growth, cell differentiation, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and inflammation.
The Swansea University cancer cell recognition research is an international collaboration with the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen in Munich, Germany, The Francis Crick Institute in London and Newcastle upon Tyne University.
Earlier reports have shown that conformation of collagen plays a vital role in cell recognition and signaling.
The study (1) reported that new cell recognition software had a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 88% for immature myeloid cells.
Glycomics is the study of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing biomolecules in biological processes such as cell recognition, immune response, cell-to-cell interaction, infection and inflammation.
The newly identified mode of cancer cell recognition by the immune system opens up new possibilities for leukaemia immunotherapy[1].
These data indicate that anti-inflammatory response after apoptotic cell recognition is mediated, at least in part, via TGF-[beta] derived from the positive cross talk between COX-2/[PGE.sub.2]/EP2 and HGF/c-Met signaling pathways.