cellophane


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cellophane,

thin, transparent sheet or tube of regenerated cellulosecellulose,
chief constituent of the cell walls of plants. Chemically, it is a carbohydrate that is a high molecular weight polysaccharide. Raw cotton is composed of 91% pure cellulose; other important natural sources are flax, hemp, jute, straw, and wood.
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. Cellophane is used in packaging and as a membrane for dialysisdialysis
, in chemistry, transfer of solute (dissolved solids) across a semipermeable membrane. Strictly speaking, dialysis refers only to the transfer of the solute; transfer of the solvent is called osmosis.
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. It is sometimes dyed and can be moisture-proofed by a thin coating of pyroxylinpyroxylin
, partially nitrated cellulose (see nitrocellulose). It is used in lacquers, plastics, and artificial leathers. Pyroxylin lacquers are made by dissolving pyroxylin in a mixture of volatile solvents and adding a plasticizer and a pigment or dye.
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. There are several steps in the preparation of cellophane from raw cellulose. The cellulose is first treated with an alkali, e.g., sodium hydroxide, and mixed with carbon disulfide to form viscose (see viscose processviscose process
, method widely used for the commercial preparation of rayon. Cellulose, prepared from either wood pulp or, less commonly, cotton linters, is treated with sodium hydroxide (an alkali) and then with carbon disulfide, the resulting product being a substance called
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). The viscose is aged for several days and then forced through a straight or circular slit into a dilute acid solution. The dissolved cellulose precipitates, and this regenerated cellulose has a lower molecular weight and a less orderly structure than the cellulose from which it is formed.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cellophane

 

a thin, transparent, sheet material obtained from viscose (see alsoHYDRATED CELLULOSE FILMS). It is mainly used as a packaging material and as an artificial casing for sausage products.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cellophane

[′sel·ə‚fān]
(materials)
A thin, transparent sheeting of regenerated cellulose; it is moisture-proof, and sometimes dyed, and used chiefly as food wrapping or as bags for dialysis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 Arrange paper and cellophane (one-and-a-half times the height of the bottle) in a landscape shape then stand the bottle in the very centre.
Taking advantage of this trend allows us to combine natural paper with thin, crispy cellophane to create a package that provides many of the benefits of the foil bag while being made of up to 60 percent renewable, compostable materials.
Wrap the chocolate drops in cellophane. Tie the spatula or spoon onto the jar with ribbon and pack in a gift bag or box with the chocolate, sprinkles and cupcake cases.
The first clue pointing to Cellophane Man came from an incomplete DNA profile obtained from blood on a piece of cellophane found on the floor next to the head of Miss White, pictured.
Place the cellophane over the end of the torch and sticky tape its edges in place, so the light can pass through it.
The only disappointment was that the bottle no longer came in squeaky yellow cellophane. Perhaps it was this that imparted the cure, not the liquid inside.
Travel-friendly candle tins are made from recycled materials and the refills are packaged in biodegradable cellophane with a hangtag that grows wildflowers when planted.
Traditional cellophane films are largely based on renewable cellulose, but they don't meet the latest strict standard for biodegradability and compostability (ASTM D6400).
Packed in cellophane sleeves "gift sticks" of five, the pastel foil-wrapped butterflies are available in solid milk chocolate, along with a variety of fillings, including milk or dark chocolate ganache, creamy peanut butter and smooth caramel.
Walkers spotted the 55lb haul wrapped in cellophane on the beach near Plymouth, Devon, and took it to a police station.
Kleenex, like the cellophane on a pack of cough drops, the tinfoil on
Kullman announced that it has been retained by KieranTimberlake Associates of Philadelphia to build the Cellophane House for the Museum of Modern Art's (MoMA) exhibition "Home Delivery: Fabricating the Modern Dwelling." Made of recyclable materials and equipped with photovoltaic panels for electricity and polypropylene panels for thermal insulation, the Cellophane House will be one of five full-scale prefabricated houses on exhibit in the outdoor space to the west of MoMA's building.