celluloid


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celluloid

[from cellulose], transparent, colorless synthetic plasticplastic,
any organic material with the ability to flow into a desired shape when heat and pressure are applied to it and to retain the shape when they are withdrawn. Composition and Types of Plastic
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 made by treating cellulose nitrate with camphor and alcohol. Celluloid was the first important synthetic plastic and was widely used as a substitute for more expensive substances, such as ivory, amber, horn, and tortoiseshell. It is highly flammable and has been largely superseded by newer plastics with more desirable properties. It has been used for combs, brush handles, billiard balls, knife handles, buttons, and other useful objects.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Celluloid

 

a plastic based on cellulose nitrate (pyroxylin). It also contains a plasticizer (dibutyl phthalate, castor oil, petrolatum, or synthetic camphor) and a dye. Celluloid is processed by hot stamping, pressing, and mechanical working. It is used in the manufacture of various products, including plane-table boards, rulers, certain haberdashery goods, and toys. Because Celluloid is highly flammable, there has been a considerable reduction in its use.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

celluloid

A relatively tough thermoplastic material made from plasticized cellulose nitrate with camphor; inflammable, easily molded, readily dyed, not light-stable.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

celluloid

1. a flammable thermoplastic material consisting of cellulose nitrate mixed with a plasticizer, usually camphor: used in sheets, rods, and tubes for making a wide range of articles
2. 
a. a cellulose derivative used for coating film
b. one of the transparent sheets on which the constituent drawings of an animated film are prepared
c. a transparent sheet used as an overlay in artwork
d. cinema film
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A celluloid clamshell Camphor is distilled from the Cinnamonum camphorum tree, the greatest abundance of which in the world was found in Formosa, now Taiwan, but formerly an island in the Japanese empire.
The film, they said, would hopefully be a valuable addition to the celluloid scene.
The feature article, penned by Jay Blotcher, included interviews with Michael Schiavi, author of the biography Celluloid Activist: The Life and Times of Vito Russo, and Jeffrey Schwarz, director of the 2011 documentary Vito.
I still had my friendly celluloid and wood slide rule, although the cardboard box was no longer in a condition to hold it.
They have released a film discovery app, Celluloid , based on award winning technologies that were developed by US tech and media executive Dwight Marcus, in which Morad invested in 2001 for development, and which they are now using on license.
A second and parallel debate concerns the continuing decline of celluloid acquisition in favour of digital capture, with a consequent collapse of the film manufacture, processing and related services.
I have personally had a lifetime of talking, writing and lecturing about "cloth-headed celluloid idols'' after more than 50 years of writing in the gossip and entertainment vineyards.
The films which were selected are "101 Chodyangal", "Artist", "Celluloid", "Kanyaka Talkies", "Kunjananthante Kada" and "Shutter".
Instead, Shantanu and Nikhil will be modelling their collection around what they call the " the darker side of celluloid".
Some of the directors and cinematographers interviewed by Reeves regret the end of the celluloid era.