cellulose ester


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cellulose ester

[′sel·yə‚lōs ′es·tər]
(organic chemistry)
Cellulose in which the free hydroxyl groups have been replaced wholly or in part by acidic groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, the best method for sterilizing LCOs is autoclaving, although if sterilization is required losses with mixed cellulose ester are similar to those with autoclaving.
it can be seen that the two clearcoats containing cellulose ester showed a much steeper increase in complex viscosity than the control clearcoat.
In order to gain a better understanding of the influence of cellulose ester additives on surface topography and microstructure, atomic force microscopic (AFM) techniques were employed.
This paper gives a detailed analysis of the effect of material selection and processing conditions on the performance of cellulose ester bio-plastics.
Eastman Chemical Company has made formulating waterborne coatings with CMCAB (carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate) cellulose esters easier by updating its recommended solutions and dispersions recipes.
In conjunction with each other, these techniques have provided the ability to differentiate between coating additives and understand the effect that the molecular weight of cellulose esters has on the level of metallic flake alignment in coil coatings.
The chemistry of cellulose esters and the benefits they offer to coatings formulators will be the focus of a presentation by Eastman senior technical service representative Koustubh Kulkarni at this years Coatings Trends and Technologies Conference in Lincolnshire, Illinois.
The polymers, which are studied among biodegradable polymeric pairs, are cellulose esters and PHB blends.
The industrial applications of organic cotton fiber are mainly in the chemical industry in the form of dissolving pulp for the manufacturing of cellulose nitrate, viscose, cellulose esters, and cellulose acetate.
In the last few decades, long chain cellulose esters have still been prepared by grafting fatty acids and their derivatives onto cellulose, either by surface or bulk reactions, employing various methods (Berlioz et al 2009; Boufi and Belgacem, 2006; Bras et al, 2007; Crepy et al, 2009; Freire et al, 2006; Pasquini et al, 2008; Peydecastaing et al, 2006).
The topics include biorefining and the pulp and paper industry, oxygen bleaching, the chemistry and physics of cellulose and cellulosic substances, cellulose fibers in the papermaking process, functional cellulose microspheres, optical properties of cellulose esters and applications to optical functional films, and antibacterial fibers.