cement gland

cement gland

[si′ment ‚gland]
(invertebrate zoology)
A structure in many invertebrates that produces cement.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Female with small orifice of cement gland located on median line of anterior sole region (Fig.
Cement gland in pedal sole described above (head-foot) (Figs 22, 23: eg).
This adhesive is produced in cement gland cells and conducted through a canal system to the area of attachment.
Most studies of the cement apparatus (cement gland cells and canals) were carried out on Sessilia (acorn barnacles) in the 1970s.
We made gross morphologic measurements of body length (rostral tip of the cement gland to the tip of the tail), interocular distance (between the medial edges of the eyes), and body shape (presence of abnormal dorsal curvature).
Cement gland development, ovary maturation and reproductive cycles in the American lobster Homarus americanus.
encrust, proteinaceous cement glands at the ready, securing a launch
Proboscis receptacle is double walled; lemnisci slightly unequal testes in the anterior trunk; four tubular cement glands; Saefftigen's pouch and cement glands elongated; bursa is well developed and muscular.
Thereupon, cement glands in the antennae secrete a strong adhesive that securely anchors the creature's head to the substrate.
By extracting the contents of cement glands from thousands of marine worms, scientists have identified a component of silk and two unusual proteins used for making the worms' tubes.
These sequences, which represent the first three proteins identified in the American species, were chosen because they are among the most abundantly expressed in the cement glands (Wang and Stewart, 2012), and because they are each representative of one category of adhesive proteins (i.e., respectively the GY-rich, the H-repeat, and the SY-rich categories; Endrizzi and Stewart, 2009).
Other studies have shown that the antennules (Nott and Foster, 1969), frontal filaments (Kauri, 1961; Walker, 1974), dermal pits (Walker and Lee, 1976), lattice organs (Hoeg et al., 1998), and cement glands (Walker, 1971; Okano et al., 1996) are innervated, but the nerves associated with each of these structures have not been traced back to the central nervous system.