coenobite

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coenobite

, cenobite
a member of a religious order following a communal rule of life
References in periodicals archive ?
The first question arising from these remarks is which exact 'Lebensform' it is which is advertised here: monasticism, yes, but cenobitic, eremitic, and cohabiting versions are presented as (almost) equally valid: the right choice depends on external situations.
5) In cenobitic monastic communities, all resources axe held in common, members' needs are provided for from common resources, and monastic life takes place in community.
Similar stories of dispersal and destruction can be told for all 178 cenobitic and mendicant communities dissolved in Bavaria in the early nineteenth century.
Martin of Tours was the founder of cenobitic monasticism in Gaul (see McGuire 2003: 168).
Despite narrowing his focus to the "Golden Age" of both anchoritic and cenobitic forms of monastic life, H.
14) Seraphim stands out by his willingness to follow the Spirit through regular cenobitic life to a hermit's vocation, to years as a virtual recluse, to an intensely active ministry of healing the distressed and organising the Diveyevo women's communities.
To understand how regionalist literature and local color function as variant strains of ascetic practice, it is necessary to differentiate between local color as a cenobitic strain and regionalist literature as an eremitic strain of asceticism.
As the style of life at Kellia evolved, towards a more cenobitic form oriented towards the outside world of nearby Christian laity and welcoming visitors, larger spaces were built, and it is here, over and above the individual dwellings with their pious or personal-name graffiti, that many of the most interesting inscriptions were found.
The Jew is not just, or not securely, the polemicized Other, but a figure for the highest cenobitic aspiration--love of the Word--and for the ever present temptations of individual will and flesh that distract the monk and threaten his relation to the community.
Cenobitic or community monasticism as developed by Pachomius in fourth-century Egypt offered an alternative to the heroic struggle for perfection of loners such as Antony (died ca.
Later apologists for cenobitic living also recognized a parallel between the polis and the monastic community.
In the context of cenobitic monasticism, the classic work on spiritual direction is St.