censor

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censor

(sĕn`sər), title of two magistrates of ancient Rome (from c.443 B.C. to the time of Domitian). They took the census (by which they assessed taxation, voting, and military service) and supervised public behavior. They also had charge of public works and filled vacancies among the senators and knights.

Censor

 

in ancient Rome, one of the highest magistracies. There were two censors, who were elected by the comitia centuriata (Centuriate Assembly) once every five years. According to classical tradition, the office was created in 443 B.C. Originally held only by patricians, it was opened to plebeians in 351 B.C. The censors conducted the census, supervised morals, compiled lists of senators and equites (after the late fourth century), and administered state finances. The office gradually lost its importance, and under Sulla the censors were essentially deprived of their authority. Beginning with Julius Caesar in the mid-first century B.C, the Roman ruler assumed the power of the censors. Subsequently, in the imperial age the office was eliminated.

censor

1. (in republican Rome) either of two senior magistrates elected to keep the list of citizens up to date, control aspects of public finance, and supervise public morals
2. Psychoanal the postulated factor responsible for regulating the translation of ideas and desires from the unconscious to the conscious mind
References in periodicals archive ?
There is nothing scandalous or censorable in |Lola u unlike |Kinatay.
These stories proliferate with characters uncertain of their sexuality, or more accurately, readers being made uncertain of such, in the context of repeated instances of masochism and sadism: our prototypical post-liberal culture's superficial barometers of censorable cruelty.
Hawks: Well, they said the scene that I had was very censorable.
Previously sexual material had been deemed censorable if it "tended to corrupt" its audience, or those who might be especially susceptible.
The mediating onstage "audience" allows the actual audience of the play to be amused by what they know to be a deception, and allows Jardiel to get away with a potentially censorable scene.