central apnea


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central apnea

[¦sen·trəl ′ap·nē·ə]
(medicine)
A pause in breathing lasting more than 10 seconds that is caused by a failure of commands from the brain. Also known as central sleep apnea.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, in Mecp2tm1.1Jae null (hemizygous) mice on a mixed-strain background [92], the principal phenotype is tachypnea along with hyperventilation similar to human RTT [93], whereas in Mecp2tm1.1Bird null or heterozygous mice on a pure C57BL/6J background [94] the principal phenotype is repetitive spontaneous central apnea [95-97], whereas the Mecp2tm1.1Bird male mice provide an excellent animal model of spontaneous central apnea and possibly obstructive apnea [28].
We look at our "airflow" channel and interpret these changes as central apneas and hypopneas.
When an apnea monitor alarms for bradycardia and lack of diaphragmatic movement simultaneously indicating a central apnea event, vigorous stimulation is immediately indicated.
Mixed * Interval during which there is no respiratory effort (central apnea pattern) and an interval during which there are obstructed respiratory efforts (Strohl, 2007).
Episodes of central apnea, obstructive apnea with hypopnea, as well as disturbances in the sleep/wake cycle, are most common.
In mixed apnea, a period of central apnea is followed by a period of obstructive apnea before regular breathing resumes.
* Central Apnea is when the airway remains open but the diaphragm and chest muscles stop working.
Mixed disturbances occur when central apnea precedes obstructive episodes.
The overall central apnea hypopnea index (CAHI) was 6.3/hour and the PB was 36.6 minutes (10.8%) of the total sleep time.
OBJECTIVE: We examined associations of daily ambient air pollution concentrations with central apnea (prolonged pauses in breathing) and bradycardia (low heart rate) events among infants prescribed home cardiorespiratory monitors.
Sometimes the increased breathing ("recovery breaths") overshoots and lowers the C02 too much so a central apnea or hypopnea occurs.
Data from 16 consecutive patients with AC-1 malformations showed a significant improvement in the central apnea index from 14.9 to 1.3 based on full-night polysomnography conducted approximately 200 days after decompression surgery (Neurology 2006;66:136-8).
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