central

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Related to central venous catheterization: Venous Access

central

1. 
a. of or relating to the central nervous system
b. of or relating to the centrum of a vertebra
2. (of a force) directed from or towards a point
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References in periodicals archive ?
Central venous catheterization based closed thoracic drainage on the basis of anti-tuberculosis treatment is effective for patients with pleural effusion caused by tuberculous pleurisy.
Gould, "Preventing complications of central venous catheterization," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
PLSVC with the absence of RSVC occurs in only 10–20% of cases of PLSVC.[sup][3] In 90% of individuals, the PLSVC drains into the RA via the CS without hemodynamic consequence.[sup][2],[3] In the remaining cases, it might drain into the left atrium resulting in a right- to left-sided shunt or into the inferior vena cava or hepatic vein.[sup][2],[3] A PLSVC can cause problems during central venous catheterization (access to the CS can cause hypotension, angina, perforation of the heart, tamponade, and arrest), pacemaker implantation (due to the tortuous course of the electrode, it might be difficult to fix the electrode into position and obtain stable capture), or cardiopulmonary bypass (isolated PLSVC impairs the use of retrograde cardioplegia).
Thyrocervical trunk pseudoaneurysm following central venous catheterization. J Card Surg 2011;26(6):617-18.
Is the intraosseous access route fast and efficacious compared to conventional central venous catheterization in adult patients under resuscitation in the emergency department?
Central venous catheterization. Crit Care Med 2007;35(5):1390-6.
Megarbane et al., "Intravascular complications of central venous catheterization by insertion site," New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
Interestingly, in this individual, there was no prior history of neck trauma or central venous catheterization. Congenital weakness and vessel wall inflammation have been proposed as possible mechanisms for atraumatic venous aneurysm formation [4, 5].
[7] found chylothorax as a complication of central venous catheterization. Warren et al.
It is usually associated with central venous catheterization, trauma, neck surgery, coagulation disorders, hypercoagulation states, endocrine alteration, local infection or malignancy, occult malignancy, neck massage, deep neck infection, and intravenous drug abuse [1, 2].

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