centralism

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centralism

the principle or act of bringing something under central control; centralization
References in periodicals archive ?
Centralists believe that our sociolegal order must come from the top down, from central government.
The 1973 and 1987 Constitutions did not substantially depart from this centralist unitary paradigm.
ISLAMABAD -- Chairman Senate Mian Raza Rabbani has said that five years on there is still a lot of resistance to the 18th Amendment mainly from the centralist mind set and more so at the federal level.
He is of a centralist disposition and believes that "the State" (or its subsidiary, Kirklees Council) should wield power over the people.
Among demands for the Government to be less 'centralist' and allow local authorities access to more of the cash they generate to re-invest in their areas came talk about the Commonwealth Games.
However, compared to other cities around the globe, Government policy is still "centralist", he said.
The CUP cadres--the next generation of centralist and Jacobin political elites--suffered a legitimacy crisis because they led the empire to its collapse.
Complaint of Maliki?s centralist tendencies and lack of real intent to resolve key issues between Baghdad and the Kurdistan Region goes back to Maliki?s first tenure at the helm.
According to Baluken, the law on the autonomy of local administrations will help soften the strict structure of the centralist state while the law on the democratic civil society will strengthen civil society groups in Turkey.
It amounts to a culture of centralist contempt, and is naturally seen most obviously in the big things: local government's huge dependence on central funding, the centre's stranglehold on councils' housebuilding, planning, and indeed their total budgets.
This observation is not as wide of the mark as it might appear and should be seen in the context of the centralist nature of the SNP, so re-nationalisation is a likely outcome for all the utilities.
The revolutions of the "Arab Spring," and the implicit doubts about the centralist configurations of existing states they carry, if not about existing borders themselves, vindicated the Kurdish nationalist hypothesis - which is no longer vehemently nationalistic - against the Arab nationalist theory.