cephalometry


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cephalometry

[‚sef·ə′läm·ə·trē]
(anthropology)
The science of measuring the head, especially for determining the characteristics of a particular race, sex, or somatotype.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cephalometry analysis of these patients was as follows: the mean distance from MP-H in group I, group II, and group II was 22, 20.
The morphology of the soft palate can be divided into six types according to their features on lateral cephalometry.
Cephalometry, or measurements of the living head, is a technique developed by anthropologists and refined by Holly Broadbent to quantify shape and sizes of skulls (Broadbent 1931).
Although the pharynx is a three-dimensional structure and patients are usually evaluated wake and during upright position, lateral cephalometry is commonly used in clinical practice because of its relative simplicity, accessibility, low cost and minimal radiation (16).
The method currently availed craniofacial form include anthropometry, photogram entry, cephalometry, ultrasound, computed tomographic (CT) scanning magnetic imaging (MRI) and optical surface scanning (Grant & Peter, 2003).
Key Words: Cephalometry, vertical dimension, physical examination (source: MeSH, NLM).
Radiographic cephalometry, has been routinely used in orthodontics for over half a century, but is now also being used as a diagnostic, treatment, and research tool by maxillofacial and plastic surgeons, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and general dental practitioners.
Cephalometry is the scientific measurement of the head using specific reference points.
Behrents combined the technique of cephalometry together with data from the Bolton Brush study in the first major and unparalleled longitudinal investigation into the phenomenon of adult skull growth (Behrents 1984; Behrents 1985A).
Effect of estimating gestational age by ultrasound cephalometry on the specificity of a-fetoprotein screening for open neural-tube defects.
Harris and his colleagues at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo used a laser beam to determine the orientation of the poorly preserved mummy's skull, and then they applied cephalometry, a precise X-ray technique that does not damage mummies.