ceramic aggregate

ceramic aggregate

[sə′ram·ik ′ag·rə·gət]
(materials)
Portland cement concrete containing lumps of ceramic material.
Concrete made with porous clay to reduce its weight.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ceramic aggregate

Ceramic products in lump or fragment form, usually colored, used in making ornamental concrete.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The recycled ceramic aggregate employed came from a ceramic sanitary and earthenware ware factory.
They discovered that recycled ceramic aggregates showed a more irregular shape than NA, which provides a higher bond between recycled ceramic aggregates and the cement paste.
At 28 d, the use of ceramic aggregates resulted an increase in flexural strength (up to 37%) and compressive strength (up to 150%) (Abadou et al., 2016).
Mechanical properties of structural concrete with fine recycled ceramic aggregates. Construction and Building Materials, 64, 103-113.
In Ceramic Waste Concretes fine aggregate was replaced with the fine ceramic aggregate by 10% 15% and 20% by weight to prepare three types of concretes CC-10 CC-15 and CC-20 respectively.
The extent of carbonation of ceramic aggregate was determined by Process Lab of Chemical Engineering Department UET Lahore.
All of the step cone cores were made with a 1% coldbox binder addition, with the exception of the "C" ceramic aggregate, which was bonded with 1.7% total binder based on the sand's weight.
Slurries used in the ceramic core process are based upon modified ethyl silicate binder and a ceramic aggregate of controlled density and particle size distribution.
The substitution by coarse recycled ceramic aggregates always leads to an increase of total porosity.
The use of coarse recycled ceramic aggregates instead of natural calcareous aggregate always decreases the modulus of elasticity of mortars, which becomes 18 GPa in case of coarse RBA and 22 GPa in case of coarse RCA, respectively, 51% and 32% lower than the reference mortar.
* Economical and Technical Feasibility of Using Synthetic (non-Silica) Ceramic Aggregates as an Option for Silica Ruling Compliance, (4K and Division 10)