artery

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Related to cerebellar artery: basilar artery

artery,

blood vessel that conveys blood away from the heartheart,
muscular organ that pumps blood to all parts of the body. The rhythmic beating of the heart is a ceaseless activity, lasting from before birth to the end of life. Anatomy and Function

The human heart is a pear-shaped structure about the size of a fist.
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. Except for the pulmonary artery, which carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs, arteries carry oxygenated blood from the heart to the tissues. The largest arterial trunk is the aortaaorta
, primary artery of the circulatory system in mammals, delivering oxygenated blood to all other arteries except those of the lungs. The human aorta, c.1 in. (2.54 cm) in diameter, originates at the left ventricle of the heart.
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, branches of which divide and subdivide into ever-smaller tubes, or arterioles, until they terminate as minute capillariescapillary
, microscopic blood vessel, smallest unit of the circulatory system. Capillaries form a network of tiny tubes throughout the body, connecting arterioles (smallest arteries) and venules (smallest veins).
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, the latter connecting with the veinsvein,
blood vessel that returns blood to the heart. Except for the pulmonary vein, which carries oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart, veins carry deoxygenated blood. The oxygen-depleted blood passes from the capillaries to the venules (small veins).
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 (see circulatory systemcirculatory system,
group of organs that transport blood and the substances it carries to and from all parts of the body. The circulatory system can be considered as composed of two parts: the systemic circulation, which serves the body as a whole except for the lungs, and the
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). Other important arteries are the subclavian and brachial arteries of the shoulder and arm, the carotid arteries that lead to the head, the coronary arteries that nourish the heart itself, and the iliac and femoral arteries of the abdomen and lower extremities. The walls of the large arteries have three layers: a tough elastic outer coat, a layer of muscular tissue, and a smooth, thin inner coat. Arterial walls expand and contract with each heartbeat, pumping blood throughout the body. The pulsating movement of blood, or pulsepulse,
alternate expansion and contraction of artery walls as heart action varies blood volume within the arteries. Artery walls are elastic. Hence they become distended by increased blood volume during systole, or contraction of the heart.
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, may be felt where the large arteries lie near the body surface.

artery

[′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
A vascular tube that carries blood away from the heart.

artery

any of the tubular thick-walled muscular vessels that convey oxygenated blood from the heart to various parts of the body
References in periodicals archive ?
Walker, "Persistent trigeminal artery terminating in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report," Neurosurgery, vol.
Tortuosity of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, posterior inferior cerebellar artery, basilar artery, or vertebral artery can compress the facial nerve at the root exit zone, resulting in unilateral spasms.
The 6th nerve thus turns superiorly on entering the sub-arachnoid space, where it passes immediately above the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. It then ascends the anterior surface of the pons close to the basilar artery and pierces the dura next to the ramp-like clivus (anterior part of the occipital bone) to the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone (Figure 2).
Arteriolar damage occurs characteristically in the lenticulostriate arteries of the middle cerebral artery and the posterior cerebral artery, the penetrating branches of the basilar artery, and the central cerebellar artery.
Abbreviations AOP: Artery of Percheron CT: Computed tomography EKG: Electrocardiogram FLAIR: Fluid-attenuation inversion recovery images FPCA: Fetal posterior cerebral artery GCS: Glasgow coma scale ICA: Internal carotid artery MMSE: Mini-Mental State Examination MRA: Magnetic resonance angiography MRI: Magnetic resonance imaging mRS: Modified Rankin scale PCA: Posterior cerebral artery PCoA: Posterior communicating artery P1: Proximal arterial segment of the PCA (from the top of the basilar artery to the PCoA) SCA: Superior cerebellar artery TPA: Thalamoperforating artery.
Among the vascular causes, ischemic stroke in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is known to be the leading cause of acute audiovestibular loss [3, 4].
The supraorbital keyhole approach effectively exposes the frontal lobe base, anterior clinoid process, canalis opticus, olfactory sulcus, olfactory tract, optic nerve, optic chiasm, oculomotor nerve, anterior communicating artery, anterior cerebral artery A1 segment, pituitary stalk, diaphragma sellae, dorsum sellae, posterior clinoid process, basilar artery apex, posterior cerebral artery P1 segment, superior cerebellar artery proximal, front upper pontine and interpeduncular cistern, anteromedial temporal lobe, internal carotid, middle cerebral artery (M1, M2 segment, and part of M3 segment), anterior choroidal artery, posterior communicating artery; and contralateral carotid artery medial surface, anterior cerebral artery A1 and A2 proximal, middle cerebral artery M1 and M2 proximal.
Last but not least, the ability to maintain balance or equilibrium of one's body could be altered in pathology of cerebellum including stroke that attacked the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA).
Lateral medullary syndrome, also known as Wallenberg's syndrome, is an ischemic disease of the medulla which involves the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery [1].
So, the BA as a continuation of the left OA [44], the OA as a branch of the PPIA [25], or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) as BA branch [21, 25] or PPHA branch [33] was described.
(12) have shown that there was a high incidence of IEL defects in the extradural portion and near the origin of Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (PICA), showing that there was thinning of the intima in the areas of IEL defects, whereas Park et al.
The right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) was not well seen and was thought to be compressed by surrounding hemorrhage, involved with vasospasm or thrombosed.