hypoxic encephalopathy

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Related to Cerebral hypoxia: cerebral hemorrhage

hypoxic encephalopathy

[hī′päk·sik en‚sef·ə′läp·ə‚thē]
(medicine)
Brain damage syndrome caused by hypoxia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cerebral hypoxia is known to be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, and it implicates many pathological disorders in brain including neuron energy depletion, excitotoxicity injury and a great number of free radicals production (1, 2).
Cerebral hypoxia will progress until it becomes irreversible and death occurs.
A medical expert said: "Strangulation starves the brain of oxygen causing cerebral hypoxia. That leads to hypoxic euphoria which gives the dreamy high.
The official cause of death was given as Cerebral Hypoxia caused by an unassisted breech delivery.
Consultant pathologist Dr Alun Rees gave Mr Barnard's cause of death as focal cerebral necrosis and prolonged cerebral hypoxia.
An inquest was previously told Zoe, three, died in February from cerebral hypoxia, which involves a reduced supply of oxygen to the brain.
Similarly, the explorative analysis from a randomized clinical trial, SafeBoosC II, showed that none of the S100[beta], brain-fatty-acid-binding-protein, and neuroketal were associated with the burden of either cerebral hypoxia or hyperoxia [18].
GlobalData's clinical trial report, "Cerebral Hypoxia Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2016" provides an overview of Cerebral Hypoxia clinical trials scenario.
Delivoria-Papadopoulos, "Lipid free radical generation and brain cell membrane alteration following nitric oxide synthase inhibition during cerebral hypoxia in the newborn piglet," Journal of Neurochemistry, vol.
Diagnostic indications for ICP monitoring include TBI, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke accompanied by significant cerebral edema, brain tumor, neuroinfectious processes, decompensated hydrocephalus, cerebral hypoxia or anoxia producing edema, or Reyes syndrome (Bader & Littlejohns; Dunn, 2002).
Measurement of S-100B has been proposed as a biological marker of brain damage, e.g., head injury, cerebral hypoxia, and stroke (2), and of malignant melanoma (3).
Increased levels of 4-HNE have been identified in many pathologic processes, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and cerebral hypoxia. (9-11)